Ships Nostalgia banner

21 - 40 of 97 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,573 Posts
The engine in the Chieftain Tank was the Leyland L60, a multi fuel opposed piston, turbo charged, 6 cylinder motor. Multi fuel technology was first used in the Rover Meteor engine used in the Centurion, the predecessor to the Chieftain. The Meteor was a de-tuned Rolls Royce Merlin V12 engine developed by the Rover car company.
Not exactly Roy, the innards were not the same and as with the tests on MTB's with R.R. V12 they were found to be a bit weak to take severe punishment.
On the MTB/MGB they were replaced by the Packard V12 which is sometimes known as a Merlin but is a different engine, the only similarity is that it was also a V12.
Hubert Scott Paine the owner of British Power Boats managed to negotiate himself a commission from Packard on each engine sold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,845 Posts
Thanks Chad for the details.

I agree that there has been lots of confusion over the V12 Packard marine engine used in MTB,s and the RR Merlin. Packard built Merlins under licence for aviation, which is where the confusion began. Also, there is a superficial similarity between the engines, although the marine engine is larger. According to some old RAF fitters I knew, the Packard Merlins had a more decorative finish and a really nice toolkit. One snag was that not all their parts were interchangeable with the Rolls Royce built engines.

If the memory is accurate, the Packard Marine V12 was developed for the United States Coastguard, around the time that the Hall Scott V12 had gone into production for the same service.

Not exactly Doxfords, I know, but engines are engines!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Having served on a Doxford I was curious about the Doxford held at Beamish Museum and went there to see if it was possible to have a look at the engine whilst the rest of the family had a look around the other exhibits. The engine is I believe held in the large sheds on the left hand side as you approach the 'Town' after numerous enquiries there appeared to be no one around who could give permission that day.
There is some kind of a childish spate between Tyne and Wear Museums and Beamish about funding that has apparently meant people can't go into see it. it is in the Regional Museums Store where large exhibits are kept, the large sheds you referred to, adjacent to the model engineering shed. There is a really backward mindset in Museums hierarchy, where the public interest is the sacrificed on the altar of their own self interest. Take the working model of the Doxford 760J9 engine. It was built in Doxfords Engine works, by the tool room staff there. It is of a Sunderland designed and built engine, by a Sunderland Company whose origins can allegedly be traced back to the Knights of Willliam the conqueror who settled at Doxfordham in Northumberland. The model was in Sunderland Museum and loaned to what is now the Discovery Museum, then part of Tyne and Wear museums. When the museums were reorganized, the model mysteriously became the property of the discovery museum and will remain there. It belongs to and in Sunderland and is part of our local history and it should be back where it belongs. As for the 3 cylinder engine, I think it can be viewed by arrangement with the Doxford Engine Friends Association (DEFA). I will find out and post the details here when I do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,505 Posts
I never had the pleasure of sailing with a Doxford but worked with many who had. Indeed they did talk of their derring-do as ones who had survived battle with William the Bastard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,573 Posts
There is some kind of a childish spate between Tyne and Wear Museums and Beamish about funding that has apparently meant people can't go into see it. it is in the Regional Museums Store where large exhibits are kept, the large sheds you referred to, adjacent to the model engineering shed. There is a really backward mindset in Museums hierarchy, where the public interest is the sacrificed on the altar of their own self interest. Take the working model of the Doxford 760J9 engine. It was built in Doxfords Engine works, by the tool room staff there. It is of a Sunderland designed and built engine, by a Sunderland Company whose origins can allegedly be traced back to the Knights of Willliam the conqueror who settled at Doxfordham in Northumberland. The model was in Sunderland Museum and loaned to what is now the Discovery Museum, then part of Tyne and Wear museums. When the museums were reorganized, the model mysteriously became the property of the discovery museum and will remain there. It belongs to and in Sunderland and is part of our local history and it should be back where it belongs. As for the 3 cylinder engine, I think it can be viewed by arrangement with the Doxford Engine Friends Association (DEFA). I will find out and post the details here when I do.
In the past I have experienced the disappearance of exhibits from a Museum which was down to the local Council and are somewhere in their storage facility never to be seen again it would seem.
I would be obliged if you could let me have the details and Thank You.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
Sailed on 2 ships with Doxfords. The 'Iron Crown' of Common brothers with a Scott Doxford, brilliant ran like a sewing machine. Then the 'Blanchland' Stevie Clarkes only the 2nd P type built was a disaster. Constantly breaking down culminating in crankcase explosion in the Pacific en route Pimentel to Aucland. Doxford sent a gang of fitters out to Auckland who decided that the shaft was not aligned with engine correctly!
Ship was eventually sold for scrap following severe damage to Main engine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,139 Posts
never said it was, read carefully.
the Cammell Laird Fullagar, double acting engines with OP (Ouch)

Please read this very carefully I will only say this once a double acting engine is also reffed to as a double banger(fires on both strokes in the same cylinder) and the Fullagar is a 2 stroke OP.Here endth the lesson(Applause)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,139 Posts
Sailed on 2 ships with Doxfords. The 'Iron Crown' of Common brothers with a Scott Doxford, brilliant ran like a sewing machine. Then the 'Blanchland' Stevie Clarkes only the 2nd P type built was a disaster. Constantly breaking down culminating in crankcase explosion in the Pacific en route Pimentel to Aucland. Doxford sent a gang of fitters out to Auckland who decided that the shaft was not aligned with engine correctly!
Ship was eventually sold for scrap following severe damage to Main engine
First 2P'swas MONTANA & TUDOR PRINCE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
'Blanchland' may have been 3rd one then! I know it was one of the first and I think 'Taybank' of Bank line was an early one with problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,573 Posts
Aye, that was the vessel the North Sands, thanks A.D.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Once in a while I went below to enjoy the views!
My first ship as a watchkeeper (1966) was Caltex Calcutta with a 5 cylinder Doxford LB. I was in the last few months of my apprenticeship and was put on the 8-12 on my own - (my salary went up from £25-0s-0d to £68-13s-4d and I was called Senior Engineer Apprentice by Caltex and Acting Fiver by ship staff). I used to spent a small part of every watch standing in the top port forward corner of the engine room watching what seemed poetry in motion to me!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,819 Posts
I used to spent a small part of every watch standing in the top port forward corner of the engine room watching what seemed poetry in motion to me!

Even did the same on Loch Lomond. Walk behind the wheelhouse, step into the funnel door and you could see the tops of the big 9 cyl Kincaid B&W. Sometimes in pale green, sometimes pale blue. I think the 2/E's use to change the colour every year or so. Didn't matter the colour... it was usually spotless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
As a cadet I sailed on a 76J6 in Bibby Line's Warwickshire, 1978 I think. Ran like a sewing machine, but was a complete pig to start astern. This was allegedly because as they were experimenting with increasing turbocharging, they gave her upper piston cranks more lead to get a bigger exhaust pulse. Of course going astern the timing was all to hell.... IIRC the lead was alleged to be 11 degrees, but as I only sailed on the one I don't know what a 'normal' lead was on a J type. I have to say I loved it as an engine, but I didn't have to change a combustion belt in that 5 months! Ahem.
 
21 - 40 of 97 Posts
Top