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As a cadet I sailed on a 76J6 in Bibby Line's Warwickshire, 1978 I think. Ran like a sewing machine, but was a complete pig to start astern. This was allegedly because as they were experimenting with increasing turbocharging, they gave her upper piston cranks more lead to get a bigger exhaust pulse. Of course going astern the timing was all to hell.... IIRC the lead was alleged to be 11 degrees, but as I only sailed on the one I don't know what a 'normal' lead was on a J type. I have to say I loved it as an engine, but I didn't have to change a combustion belt in that 5 months! Ahem.
Lead - an interesting concept - on Bank Lines 76J6 Corabank Class the lead on the cranks was 9 degrees 28' but because of the differential stroke of the upper and lower pistons this translated to a difference of just under 2 degrees between IDC (Least combustion space volume) and TDC on the lower piston.

The 76J4C Fish class had zero lead - the engine would not stop naturally at a dead spot, but if it was left in one position after maintenance it wouldn't kick on air and had to be turned to a more suitable position.
 

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It was very interesting to see the post about the 2 Port Line ships . Both were fine ships . In days before the box boats ! I sailed in the Port Sydney in 1958 and in the Port Melbourne in. 1960 . Great ships . I have very happy memories of those days . Many years later I saw the Port Line crest from the bow of the Port Sydney in the Maritime museum in Melbourne . Happy days indeed. I was on deck . Alex C .
 

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Lead - an interesting concept - on Bank Lines 76J6 Corabank Class the lead on the cranks was 9 degrees 28' but because of the differential stroke of the upper and lower pistons this translated to a difference of just under 2 degrees between IDC (Least combustion space volume) and TDC on the lower piston.

The 76J4C Fish class had zero lead - the engine would not stop naturally at a dead spot, but if it was left in one position after maintenance it wouldn't kick on air and had to be turned to a more suitable position.
Our Lancashire and IRC Herefordshire were 'allegedly' add-ons to Bank line builds, the same as Corabank. The Warwickshire was equally a Bank Line copy but of an earlier 3+2 hold configuration class. Nice old ship, good classic lines, it was a good trip but that astern starting.....grrr. Did my first watches on my own on her, as the second preferred his bed of a morning. Irish and liked a beer.... Totally handamatic, I learnt quickly!
 

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There's a nice little model of Taikoo made 4-legger in the Hong Kong Maritime Museum.
Only sailed on one Doxford, built under licence by Commonwealth Engine Works, Port Melbourne. No trouble with it at all, ran like a top. However, two other ships with CEW-built engines, Mount Kembla & Mount Keira, had no end of trouble with main and bottom ends. As an apprentice at State Dockyard, Newcastle, had regular overtime scraping and fitting new bearings. The cause of the trouble was never identified, to the best of my knowledge, but there was a strong suggestion that it was somehow a result of insufficient scantlings around the ER.
Another regular was making replacement swing arm cooling pipes.
 

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There's a nice little model of Taikoo made 4-legger in the Hong Kong Maritime Museum.
Only sailed on one Doxford, built under licence by Commonwealth Engine Works, Port Melbourne. No trouble with it at all, ran like a top. However, two other ships with CEW-built engines, Mount Kembla & Mount Keira, had no end of trouble with main and bottom ends. As an apprentice at State Dockyard, Newcastle, had regular overtime scraping and fitting new bearings. The cause of the trouble was never identified, to the best of my knowledge, but there was a strong suggestion that it was somehow a result of insufficient scantlings around the ER.
Another regular was making replacement swing arm cooling pipes.
I'm pretty sure that this model used to be in the managers office of HUD in Hong Kong. Saw it several times...

Personnaly, I sailed on two BISCO ore carriers with 4LBD engines, both with strut driven fuel pumps and those really dangerous inertia tyle fuel cut offs, could never even be considered a governor. Totalled about 14 months...
 

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There is some kind of a childish spate between Tyne and Wear Museums and Beamish about funding that has apparently meant people can't go into see it. it is in the Regional Museums Store where large exhibits are kept, the large sheds you referred to, adjacent to the model engineering shed. There is a really backward mindset in Museums hierarchy, where the public interest is the sacrificed on the altar of their own self interest. Take the working model of the Doxford 760J9 engine. It was built in Doxfords Engine works, by the tool room staff there. It is of a Sunderland designed and built engine, by a Sunderland Company whose origins can allegedly be traced back to the Knights of Willliam the conqueror who settled at Doxfordham in Northumberland. The model was in Sunderland Museum and loaned to what is now the Discovery Museum, then part of Tyne and Wear museums. When the museums were reorganized, the model mysteriously became the property of the discovery museum and will remain there. It belongs to and in Sunderland and is part of our local history and it should be back where it belongs. As for the 3 cylinder engine, I think it can be viewed by arrangement with the Doxford Engine Friends Association (DEFA). I will find out and post the details here when I do.
I had a little laugh to myself. I didn't think Doxfords had any friends.
 

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Having served on a Doxford I was curious about the Doxford held at Beamish Museum and went there to see if it was possible to have a look at the engine whilst the rest of the family had a look around the other exhibits. The engine is I believe held in the large sheds on the left hand side as you approach the 'Town' after numerous enquiries there appeared to be no one around who could give permission that day.

I was there last week, the doxford is a test engine and can be seen through viewing area where a video plays interview with ex doxford design engineer and some workers, one guy quite comically talked of travelling around the world with a big file repairing crankshafts
 

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I sailed with a Doxford on the Weybank, I think Bank Line were amongst their best customers at one time.

I recently went on Google Earth looking for the Doxford works and shipyards, but I've never been to Sunderland so I wasn't sure if what I was seeing was right !!

I looks like a shopping park now. :eek:
 

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I'm only making a post to see if it jolts the thread into normal indexing.

Never sailed on Doxfords. nor, which were higher personal priorities of mine, T2s or the free piston gasifier GTV.
 

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Test post - I seem unable to view the last two posts on this thread, (One is listed by Varley but the last one I can see, above this is by Bob Clay) anyone else??
 

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I'm only making a post to see if it jolts the thread into normal indexing.

Never sailed on Doxfords. nor, which were higher personal priorities of mine, T2s or the free piston gasifier GTV.
Both now visible David, thanks, I do hope the malaise that has afflicted the Gallery is not spreading, couldn't see yours or the Science Museum one this morning when I posted.
 

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What were the advantages/disadvantages of the opposed piston marine diesel engines? I never sailed on a ship with one.

Frank
 

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There used to be a cracking model of a Doxford, built by David Rowan Apprentices, in the old Transport Museum Glasgow, until they decided to posh the museum up ??? It disappeared , anybody know of it's whereabouts ?
 

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Doxford Engines

Sailed with LB, J type, and JC type, the J types with Servodyne Governors (once teething troubles were over ) were a nice engine, JC types running on 380 Cst fuel were a bit of a pain on economical speed running because of turbo charger fouling, Also bleating from London about having to run another alternator during the day because of the extra load of the Aux. Blower.
Cliff Cocker
 

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Sailed with LB, J type, and JC type, the J types with Servodyne Governors (once teething troubles were over ) were a nice engine, JC types running on 380 Cst fuel were a bit of a pain on economical speed running because of turbo charger fouling, Also bleating from London about having to run another alternator during the day because of the extra load of the Aux. Blower.
Cliff Cocker
Not forgetting the misguided attempts by Dr Orbeck to "Improve" the engines - grand finale being the fitment of B&W style fuel valves with tip recirculation - one Chief Engineer (Bl,,,y Fool by initials and nature) decided to fit tips that impinged on the crowns, burning through the lower crown and, eventually filling the combustion space with LO, as the skylights had been left open at some previous time the transverse beam on #4 unit had seized to the side rod.....
 
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