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You can leave some of your plastic packaging at the shop, but how long will it take before this causes the producer to change his ways?
If Canada can pledge to ban single use plastic by 2021 why can't the UK. If those who manufacture/use single use plastic were made to pay for it's disposal the ban would be immediate.

Mind you, the waffle about the environment on last night's 'Who wants to be clown in chief' ensures that nothing will happen in the UK.
 

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As with all trash disposal and recycling the key must be prepayment (or taxpayer payment as with domestic trash). The additional cost at point of sale both discourages purchase/lessens the marketability of the core product and if properly dispersed pays for the safe disposal/recycling.

We have recycling depots at very convenient locations (some would say an Island this size might need only one but there are two within a few minutes drive plus collection for more modest loads at three sits even closer, two at retailers).

An yet there are still unsightly and unhygienic dumpings of waste for which the recycling depots charge. (Probably not an issue for packaging plastic which the incinerator burns for electricity). Add the cost of disposal to every refrigerator, TV or other kit containing hazards and the temptation to dump in the countryside goes away.

Added to which any who continue to dump there are clearly doing so without reason and can be added to the list of those we should prevent from breeding.
 

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I watched "Inside the factory" Yesterday. Bottling Ribena. One of their machines, running 24/7 makes six bottles a second. They are not the biggest sellers by any means, so multiply by all plastic bottles throughout the planet and you have some idea of the size of the problem. Every bottle produced there, is filled and out the door the same day. Gawd knows what the answer is.
 

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There was a piece on regional news (BBC 1) this evening concerning this plastic pollution in the Mersey.
It turns out that Greenpeace actually did their sampling in the Mersey as it passes through Manchester, particularly in the vicinity of a giant plastics manufacturing plant making ‘nurdles’ beside the river at Carrington, operated by the plastics company, Basell Polyolefins UK,
Greenpeace sampled upstream and downstream of the plant and found that downstream plastic levels were ten times higher than those upstream.
Case closed.
 

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#7

Blame lies somewhere, for sure.

There was very little plastic in the world of Mersey pilotage when I left it in 1988.

There were, however, a great many glass bottles which were dumped at the anchorage on Bottle Bank, I mile SW of the Bar Lightship, with or without ceremony.

As to pollution-on-Mersey, plastic or otherwise, several matters sping to mind:-

1. In January 1960 on arrival home from Australia, when passing the Orme's Head the wind was South-East and the air-pollution hit us like a pall. The stench of industrial smoke was as well-defined as any navigation-mark.

2. A decade later (1970), there was no air pollution. Why not? Because nobody any more did any work. Full stop.

3. A further decade later (circa 1980) much trumpeting said "The Mersey is clean" - and there were allegations (at the very least) that salmon (if not sturgeon, frankincense and myrrh) might be perceived daily in the Mersey bosom. (The water was clear, it was sparkling and pure, as any which flows between Rheims and Namur.) (Oh, really?)

4. Ironic it is, to be sure, to hear the news today, four decades later again, that serious pollution remains to be addressed. Gladly will I accept due employment as a bin-man.
 

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If folks didn’t put plastic in, there wouldn’t be a problem. We are guilty not the river. The sooner plastic is replaced the better.
 

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When it is your own backyard and you as a once proud city ignores it how can it ever change
And #13

In the late 50’s I attended a school in New Brighton. On one or two occasions, when the tide was in we would have our weekly swimming session in the river. We had to contend with more than plastic then.

Changes did happen, the river became cleaner, the black Liver buildings were spruced up and the smog became a thing of the past.
 

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One time I was working by on the Empress of Britain moored in Gladstone Dock. I was on overnight firewatch, making the rounds of the ship and reporting to the bridge every hour. During a tea break in the wheelhouse at about 22.00, me and the 3rd mate were idly watching the ship across the dock and the occasional discharges of wastewater from the hull as someone flushed a toilet, and began to discuss the amount of sewage dumped into the dock system by visiting ships. I forget the exact figure we arrived at, but we worked out the average number of ships in the port, the average number of crew, the average number of visits to the bog, and the guesstimate of the average weight of a bowel motion.
It came to an astonishing figure in the hundreds of tons per year.
We came to the conclusion that Liverpool docks were several feet deep in sh1t, despite the efforts of the Dock Board dredgers.(EEK)
 

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Never mind today's rubbish and pollution , We have had an experience in NZ where the weather has literally dug up the past.
The South Island's West Coast had a one in one hundred years rain event that poured down at about 40 mm per hour over several days causing the Fox river to breach its banks , wash away a major bridge and to erode deep enough into its banks to uncover and dislodge an historic local council dump and strew its contents down stream and out on to the coast line littering over 300 km of river banks and sea shore with debris that is still intact as the day it was dumped and buried many years ago.
They started a clean up , a pitiful but gallant effort by locals until the enormity of the pollution was brought home by the media .
This publicity forced the government to step in , contribute a few million dollars and up to one hundred army personnel to effect the clean up.
It is an unbelievable mess , an entanglement of every imaginable bit of dross still un degraded and now firmly fixed to rocks, twigs , fallen trees and the like that will necessitate 'hand picking' over six to eight months.
Even now, the ever shifting sea and sands are bringing more ashore as winds and tides change.
There will be many a soldier saying "I didn't sign up for this " but it is better than fighting the Taliban or Isis!
The point illustrated by this tragedy is that even if we had a magic wand to stop the ongoing pollution there is centuries of it buried inadequately and waiting for climate events to expose more and more.

Bob
 
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