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The following was gleaned from The Mercury Newspaper, Tuesday 27 January 1891, page 2 . Including all the quaint language of the day.

THE STEAM YACHT SAIDE.

Mr. C. G. Millar's steam yacht Saide which was originally called the Star of the Sea, and was purchased by the present owner in 1886. She arrived in Australia in May 1889, but since then has undergone not only a complete overhaul, but positively has been re-modelled. Her original rig has been changed from that of a fore-and-aft schooner to a light brigantine or topsail schooner.

Her length overall is 155ft.: beam, 24'7ft., and depth, 13'8ft., with a draught of water 15ft, aft and 10ft. forward, and the vessel is ballasted with 20 tons outside the keel, 20 tons moulded inside, and has 60 tons kentledge. This, together with the machinery, coal, stores, water, etc , makes the Saide exceedingly stiff under sail, and in a stiff, breeze she can give a good account of herself, her average speed under such cir***stances being 14 knots. During a run from Cape Schanck to Swan Island, when close hauled, she averaged 12 1/2 knots, a very creditable performance. The Saide's model has been much admired by nautical men, her shapely hull and clipper bow betokening unusual speed and clean sailing. She is painted white with a gold riband running from her handsome figure head to the carved quarter chocks, and looks, as her skipper puts it, "a saucy beauty."

Her figure-head is a copy of the statue of the Madonna at Marseilles, called by the sea-faring population of the Mediterranean the Star of 'the Sea, hence the name the Saide bore when possessed by her former owner. On deck the first thought is, " How strong she looks," her teak waterways and covering board; teak bulwarks ; the decks laid in pine, tapered to the shape of the vessel, and the easy
running gear, all strike one, not only as to the strength and excellency of workmanship, but also the conveniences for comfort and the working of the ship. All the deck fittings are of teak - the top rail, tax pin rail, fore gratings, while the after and stern sheet gratings are of white elm. Forward and just before the forecastle scuttle is a steam winch for heaving up anchors, a steam capstan for

warping, or hoisting sail. Abaft is the entrance to the forecastle, usual lockers and meat safes, and then follows in order the entrance to the officer's quarters, mess room, fore saloon, skylight, and deck house(under which is the smoking room, forming an entrance to the owner's quarters) Next is the galley and after that the entrance to the engine room and stoke hole. The deck-house forms a bridge or look out when the vessel is under steam and is fitted with neat brass rail, binnacle with Sir William Thompson's compass, chart table, etc , and the funnel is on the telescopic principle so that it can be lowered when the vessel is under sail. Aft of the engine room entrance is the skylight to that room, companion to stewards pantry, skylight to state rooms and dining saloon, and the companion. The after binnacle, wheel, and steering gear-Jarman's patent-main sheet buffers, all looking compact and neat occupy the after portion of the yacht.

The Saide is taut rigged and carries a large spread of canvas, her standing rigging and all running gear is of four stranded yacht cordage. There are four boats carried at the davits, comprising the
steam launch, owner's gig, lifeboat and dingy. The steam launch claims special mention, as it is the first of its kind in Australian waters, a perfect model, 27ft long, 5ft 8in. beam, 2ft 8in deep carvel built and made of mahogany, is fitted with Kingdom's patent quadruple tandem condensing engines, which drive the boat 9 knots on a coal consumption of 10lbs per hour - 'a little wonder ' she is
called in Hobsons Bay. She was made by Messrs Simpson and Strickland, of Dartmouth, to Mr Millar s order, a few months ago. When at sea the launch is carried on deck in chocks, her machinery and boiler coming out in one lift The Saide, when under steam, can do 9 knots, the propelling power being in a pair of cylinders 17in and 34m with a 22in. stroke, compound surface condensing, 213 indicated h.p. There is a double furnace steel boiler, and the bunkers can contain about 40 tons of coal The propeller is Bevis' patent feathering one, easily adjusted, so that progress is not impeded when the vessel is under sail. The engine room also contains a small boiler to work the winch, supply hot water for the bathrooms, or work the condenser, which will give a supply of l,000 gals. a day if required Below, the Saide is divided into four watertight compartments, first a collision bulkhead, abaft of which is the forecastle, comfortably fitted up with Scotch cots and lockers for 14 men, besides a room for the carpenter and second engineer, cupboards, lavatory, etc. Abaft this comes No 2 bulkhead, and between that and No.3 are the officer's quarters and mess room, containíng the captain s room, large and neat, chief engineer, mate, purser and second mate's rooms, and officers' and stewards' rooms.


Abaft the No. 3 bulkhead are the owner's private apartments. The cabin accommoation and decorations display considerable artistic taste. Mr. Millar's private saloon and library is paneled in oak, most elaborately carved in the Renaissance style, and fitted with table, chairs, lounges, upholstered in plush velvet, and piano to correspond. Adjoining are bedrooms and dressing-rooms, fitted up in a luxuriant manner. No. 4 bulk- head encloses the machinery and alley way leading to steward's pantry, which is provided with watertight doors Abaft No. 5 bulkhead are the pantry, lavatories, and
bathrooms, three staterooms for guests, fitted with Hungarian ash and mahogany. Next is the dining saloon paneled in a combination of walnut, Hungarian ash, mid maple root wood, the pilasters and centre panels being richly carved in original designs, while the glass on all the skylights is richly coloured and bears representations of Australian flora, birds, etc., burnt in. Then come two rooms for
the steward, and Iockers able to hold provisions for a long voyage. The Saidecarries a crew of 22 men all told. Captain Macdonald has been some years in Messrs. Millar's employ ; Mr. Blyth is chief engineer, and Mr, Denis mate, he having been previously in Mr. Millar's Red Gauntlet, since lost.

The Saide has been upwards of 12 months undergoing alterations, and in fittings she is almost new from truck to kelson. The workmanship does much credit to our Australian tradesmen. The yacht is composite built, of 383 tons, has iron frames, teak and elm planking, with copper fastening. She was built at Leith in 1883, under special survey to Lloyd's highest class, l8 years, by Messrs. Ramage and Ferguson.

 

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Isn't it wonderful to read media like this compared with the c r a p that we read today which is clearly written by school children 'journalists' on work experience. Perhaps it is just as well that so much actually goes unreported.
 

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Isn't it wonderful to read media like this compared with the c r a p that we read today which is clearly written by school children 'journalists' on work experience. Perhaps it is just as well that so much actually goes unreported.
So right, it would appear from what you see in papers today that most of them are illiterate and do not bother to proof read ! I do miss that days when journalists would actually research something and not just copy things off Facebook.
 
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