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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Another photo taken by the author on his "plate" camera which he often had cause to curse on account of not having a "plate" ready for a photo opportunity: well, it was 1907 when, I don't suppose, there were many people who owned a camera. In his log he never makes any mention of developing the photos so, I can but presume, he would have to have stored them safely during the five month long voyage.

(This is Captain Chrimes and Chief Engineer Flanagan taking a ride in Macassar when the Polyphemus was loading homeward bound).
 

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good morning hugh ferguson.s.m.7th.jan.2008.07:29.re:lifeboat no.7.i have been reading this old thread.i found it very interesting.but your link in (post 3)shows photo's of the life boat and the rescued crew menbers,an amazing story of endurance.and great navigation to make land.i liked the romantic story set in the days were japanes and Europeans did not mix.(post22)a great post.thank you for sharing.regards ben27
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
During the last couple of weeks there have been no fewer than 70 "hits" on this old thread but no further comments! Interesting!

The life-boat No.7 referred to by Ben was to be seen in one of the random pictures and was unrelated to this thread.
 

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Just for the record this book was serialised on what is now BBC Radio 4 in the early 1980's when they had a book reading at 4:30pm each weekday.
 

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The book (Surgeon's Log) ran to 31 editions (even had an American edition) and was re. and re-published over some 40 odd years. The last edition was dedicated to the author's daughter whom I had the good fortune to meet when she visited me in 1997. She, whose name was Jill and has since died, came with the very journal her father kept during the voyage and after her return home, had it all photo-copied and sent to me!
If you go to a web-site such as ABE books you will find many copies available from all over the world; there was even a Penguin paperback edition.
It became a mini travel classic and, after 9 rejections by prospective publishers, it became a best seller. It was first published in 1911.
A good read, and was probably responsible for me choosing to go to sea in the Blue Funnel Line.
Like Hugh, this book was a big contributor to me going to sea. I had my parents wartime penguin edition, now tattered beyond reading so I have bought a hard backed earlier edition to replace it. A wonderful set of stories that even though it was generations out of date when I read and reread in in the 1960s, continues even now to give a fair feel for life at sea and runs ashore.

Other books that were influential for me were The Cruise of the Cachalot, The Kontiki expedition, The Seas Were Mine, The last grain race, the various coastwise books by WW Jacobs, and when I was little I loved the Edard Ardizzone books about Tim and his seafaring adventures and even before I could read I had a Little Golden Books Boats (http://www.ebay.com/bhp/little-golden-book-boats).

When people ask me why I wanted to go to sea, I honestly cannot remember a time before I wanted to go to sea. I was so lucky to get the chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Very interesting, Hugh, I for one will be keeping an eye out for the book. It must have been very satisfying to come to meet and befriend those people.

Sailing to Japan, it seemed that everyone either hated the place or fell in love with it. I was one of the smitten and agree whole heartedly with Dr Abraham's description of Japanese ladies.

One afternoon, on a visit to Kyoto, I saw what must have been a genuine Geisha walking towards me - white face, zillion Yen kimono, dainty little steps, I was entranced. The spell was broken when she hawked up a big greenie and gobbed it out onto the pavement! Wow, I know they take years to learn the tea ceremony, etc, but she even spat gracefully! I did think that she could have had a tissue tucked into her obi though.

That was over 30 years ago, she'll have no idea of the impact she made on a gauping gai-jin in that bustling little backstreet.

John T.
Poor girl, she must have had a bad cold; I don't think trotterdotpom would see this happen should he visit Japan this day and age.

(Apologies for resurrecting one of my own threads, but at least it is about nostalgia!)
 

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Maybe not Hugh, but you never know, I hear the old traditions still survive in amongst all that crazy new stuff that goes on there.

Any news of the book's travels?

John T
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Maybe not Hugh, but you never know, I hear the old traditions still survive in amongst all that crazy new stuff that goes on there.

Any news of the book's travels?

John T
makko was the last recipient-as far as I know-I've asked him to let us know. I wouldn't think there was much left of it now!
 

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I sent it to macko I think 2 years ago.He should have read it by now methinks
Probably nobody has put their name forward as a recipient.

For the benefit of those who may not be aware, the book is about a ship's surgeon's voyage to the Far East on a Blue Funnel ship in the early 1900s. Hugh Ferguson generously made it available to SN members to pass around. It has been to a few places in Australia and now is in Mexico.

There is more information on Hugh's thread about the book.

John T
 

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Probably nobody has put their name forward as a recipient.

For the benefit of those who may not be aware, the book is about a ship's surgeon's voyage to the Far East on a Blue Funnel ship in the early 1900s. Hugh Ferguson generously made it available to SN members to pass around. It has been to a few places in Australia and now is in Mexico.

There is more information on Hugh's thread about the book.

John T
PS make that this thread!
 

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Please contact me if you would be interested in reading this book. I have it in my possession.
Rgds.
Dave
 

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If you search on 't net it is available as an electronic text. It takes a bit of finding, and I did this some time ago in Google books. It seems to have been scanned from a library book, so as libraries quietly salute and pass over the horizon, this may be the most easily available text for the interested reader.

I have just spent 30 min trying to find this from infromation in the header of my downloaded copy, but not much success. PM me if you want more details of where I downloaded it, my reply may help your search.
 

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Thanks JT not a problem at all! At the onset of someone wanting the book I thought it would be a good idea to pass books aroundthe site that we all have gathering dust and other things, and which would be of interest to others, however the postage put an end to that "bright" idea, as in some cases the books can be picked up at Abes or downloaded from Amazon, for a fraction of the cost of the postage, I just mailed a book (hard cover)to Aberdeen Scotland, and I feel I could have hand delivered it for what they charged me, but I guess thats the way it is Cheers H
 

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Hadn't thought of the postage side of things. I can't remember where I sent the book, maybe Melbourne, so not too expensive. It is a nice idea though and interesting to see how the book meanders around the world. I had a bit of drama with it myself because I took it to work and someone "borrowed" it - eventually found in the back of a drawer about 12 weeks later! Had to do a bit of a repair job on it too.

It's an interesting book and I was surprised to see that some things hadn't changed that much over the decades to th '70s, especially in Indonesia, although all different now, I think.

John T
 

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It's an interesting book and I was surprised to see that some things hadn't changed that much over the decades to th '70s, especially in Indonesia, although all different now, I think.

John T
John,
That was exactly my thought. My first ship was a true Blue. Maybe that set up the atmosphere. Later ships were Barber Blue Sea although we did the BF ports, however always going east. Then again, maybe I'm just an old romantic and too focused through through my rose tinted glasses! No, really I do believe that there was still a veneer some 70 years later of old times.
Rgds.
Dave
 

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Found it here scans.library.utoronto.ca/pdf/3/22/.../surgeonslogimpre00abrauoft.pdf
 
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