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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Launched as HMS Boscawen at Woolwich in 1844 she was one of the last 74 gun "Ships of the Line" known as the "Wooden Walls of England" to be built. She was paid out of commission in 1860 only 16 years after her launch and was eventually sailed to the Tyne and renamed the Wellesley. She spent the rest of her days as a training ship moored in the Tyne.
Many thought the trainees asigned to her were juvenile delinquents but this was not the case, in the most part the souls that were sent to the Wellesley were orphans, destitute and homeless boys from all over England. They were trained in all aspects of seamanship and would often be seen practising cutlass fighting on deck. The ship had it's own band and many boys went on to serve in naval bands after their four year stint on Wellesley. Their day started at 0530hrs with turn out and ended at 2055hrs with prayers, thier day was full and hard, but the strick regime meant Wellesley boys were ideally suited to a life on the ocean waves. Wellesley came to a sad end when on a spring day in 1914 she was burnt to a hulk despite all efforts to save her, she had spent over 30 years training some of the finest seamen of their day.
 

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Hi Jeff,
Very interesting post, was there not a Wellesley school at Blyth as well? is there any conection, I am interested because I went to the Royal Merchant Navy School at Bearwood during the war, I think the Wellesley was royal Navy, Please keep me right, I think the one in Blyth was for naughty boys, I may be wrong. Rgds Bill Atkins
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not certain who ran the Wellesley, but they must have had close connections with the RN, the boys wore Naval Uniforms they were trained in combat with cutlass and schooled in music with some going on to Naval bands. It was a misconception that the boys were criminals, from what I can find out, first and foremost they were homeless orphans but I expect they were forced into petty crime to survive. I have many cuttings with pictures but they are for the most part poor quality. Not sure about the school in Blyth Bill maybe they had a shore base.
 

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Hi Jeff,
There was a base in Blyth I think it was on the main road into the Holy City, am nearly sure it was R.N. before you pass the import dock, it was on the left handside, they flew the white ensign on the mast, we are going to Blyth this weekend and if I can get to the Library I will try and find out,
Rgds Bill Atkins
 

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The following info is taken from the Wellesley Nautical School Website.
Following the fire of the ship Wellesley the establishment was moved to Tynemouth Plaza till 1918 when money was raised to purchase the World War 1 submarine base at Blyth.It was an approved school where the emphasis was on sea training both for Royal and Merchant.However they did wear Royal Navy uniforms.In 1973 due it came under the Sunderland County Council Department and as such the emphasis changed to become "General Education based" It was renamed Wellesley Community Home.
I remember seeing the lads marching from the school to church on a Sunday accompanied by bugles and drums.
Cheers
 

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The School sounds very simular to the T. S. Indefatigable that was based in Anglesey after being moved from the Mersey because of German air raids WW2 (Hippy)
 

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Evening Jeff,
That is a useful bit of information from Spartan, I live only 500 yds from Tynemouth Plaza, ( which was the victim of a mysterious fire a few years ago) I had no idea that there was any connection with Wellesly, and even less idea that Sunderland council of the time were involved, It just go,s to show how times have changed, I.E. Tyne & Wear we are reverting back too where the boundry,s were, Northumberland & Durham, get the charts out.
Cheers Bill Atkins
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bill it looks as if there were many of these training ships around the country at one time I suppose it helped to keep the homeless off the streets as well as giving them three square meals and a good training in seamanship. Seems to me it was a good idea at that time.
 

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Hi Jeff
It would probably been around the era, that the foyboatmen rowed down to Flambourgh head for work, they must have been hard times for the people, nothing has changed, I am going to get a jab in the morning for the Bird Flu, can you believe it? must go now have got to phone BLAIR to see which surgery I have to attend, rgds Bill Atkins
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Pilots with their sons as crew used to sail cobles down as far as Flambourgh and Whitby to "seek" ships Bill, the eldest son would go onboard the ship with his father while the others were left onboard the coble to sail home. As you say hard days, ships of wood, men of steel.
 

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H.M.S.Wellesley

During the latter part of world war 2, in January 1945,a seaman gunner course at H.M.S.Wellesley in Liverpool. It was a shore establishment formally the Liverpool Southern Hospital, situated in the Dingle area.
Regards to all
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I didn't realise the name Wellesley was also associated with Liverpool, Dingle brings back memories of my days at Riversdale in Liverpool, a very run down area I think by the 1960s. Our bus from the city centre used to run through Dingle.
 

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Hi Jeff,
Very interesting post, was there not a Wellesley school at Blyth as well? is there any conection, I am interested because I went to the Royal Merchant Navy School at Bearwood during the war, I think the Wellesley was royal Navy, Please keep me right, I think the one in Blyth was for naughty boys, I may be wrong. Rgds Bill Atkins
Your right Bill. I was there from 1959-1961. It was run on RN lines with all us lads in no.8's and no. 1's, The place did us all proud. There were some boys in for petty crimes, some went there from care homes. Lots of boys who passed through the gates did well. There are Lords, published poets, they had books published, Royal Navy. The list is endless.
 

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Vic,
Did you get my last post?

I was at Wellesley in Hawkins house.
I was ther for 15 months from 1962 to 1964.
I was in the Band as a Drummer and Bugler.
I was also in the PE Display team.
 

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During the latter part of world war 2, in January 1945,a seaman gunner course at H.M.S.Wellesley in Liverpool. It was a shore establishment formally the Liverpool Southern Hospital, situated in the Dingle area.
Regards to all
I WAS GOING TO RESPOND IN SIMILAR WAY. I WAS AT WELLESLY IN JUNE/JULY 1944 HAVING CHOSEN D.E.M.S AT GLENDOWER SIMPLY BECAUSE IT GAVE 8 WEEKS IN LIVERPOOL, MY HOME BEING ONLY 7 MILES OR SO AWAY. HOWEVER HAVING BEEN ALLOCATED TO A SHIP "SAMGAUDIE", MANAGED BY BROCKLEBANKS, MY FIRST AND ONLY VOYAGE LASTED ALMOST TWO YEARS, SO IT MAY NOT HAVE SUCH A GOOD IDEA AFTER ALL.
 

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Vic,
Did you get my last post?

I was at Wellesley in Hawkins house.
I was ther for 15 months from 1962 to 1964.
I was in the Band as a Drummer and Bugler.
I was also in the PE Display team.
i was at Wellesley in Boscawen from 1961 to late 1962, then joined "mv Corbrea",the first of many ships in my 25 yrs at sea.
 

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Launched as HMS Boscawen at Woolwich in 1844 she was one of the last 74 gun "Ships of the Line" known as the "Wooden Walls of England" to be built. She was paid out of commission in 1860 only 16 years after her launch and was eventually sailed to the Tyne and renamed the Wellesley. She spent the rest of her days as a training ship moored in the Tyne.
Many thought the trainees asigned to her were juvenile delinquents but this was not the case, in the most part the souls that were sent to the Wellesley were orphans, destitute and homeless boys from all over England. They were trained in all aspects of seamanship and would often be seen practising cutlass fighting on deck. The ship had it's own band and many boys went on to serve in naval bands after their four year stint on Wellesley. Their day started at 0530hrs with turn out and ended at 2055hrs with prayers, thier day was full and hard, but the strick regime meant Wellesley boys were ideally suited to a life on the ocean waves. Wellesley came to a sad end when on a spring day in 1914 she was burnt to a hulk despite all efforts to save her, she had spent over 30 years training some of the finest seamen of their day.
the site below gives a good insight into the number of ships and the scale of the operation.

http://www.workhouses.org.uk/trainingships/#Arethusa
 
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