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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does any-one have any info on the Tresillian which sank in the fifties,I know she was one of Haines
 

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Tresillian loss

Hello, I believe the Hain Tresillian was sunk 1890 or so ...

TRESILLIAN
Peninsular & Oriental Steam Nav. Co.; 1944; W. Doxford & Sons; 7,373
tons; 431x56-5x35-5; oilengines. The motprship Tresillian, on a
voyage from Montreal to Avon-mouth with grain, took a heavy
list to port on November 30th, 1954, when her cargo shifted in
heavy weather, about 150 miles N.W. of the Bishop Rock. Her
call for help was answered by the tanker Liparus which, however,
could not get near enough to take off her crew, but put out oil to
reduce the heavy seas. The crew of the Tresillian abandoned her in a
sinking condition and the Liparus launched a motor lifeboat to pick
up the survivors on rafts and in a boat. Thirteen men were saved, one
of whom died afterwards from swallowing oil. Another four men
were picked up by the motorship Ardglen, making a total of 16
survivors from the Tresillian's crew of 40.

Best Wishes
Raymond
 

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Tresillian was built as Registan for Frank Strick in 1944. She was sold to Hains in 1946. She was 7368 grt and 5039 nrt. Built by Doxford and sons Ltd, Sunderland. She capsized and sank on 30/11/54 when her cargo shifted in heavy weather 25 miles off Ballycotton, Ireland.She was on passage from Montreal to Avonmouth with a cargo of grain.
She was the fourth and last ship to carry the name Tresillian in the Hains fleet.
Tresillian translated from Cornish means 'The sunny place' it is also a small village on the Tresillian river near Truro at the main entrance to the Tregothnan Estate.

regards
Dave
 

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Treeve,
the tail you tell is the 1954 sinking of the Tresillian (Fourth).

Tresillian (1st ) sank off Italy 1896.

regards
Dave
 

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Lloyds Register Records are correct, as I have passed them on ....
Lord Inchcape of P&O made an offer of £3.996 million for the company on 27th October 1917 after the death of Sir Edward. The fleet was valued at £2 million and cash assets of another £2 million were held, and P&O offered £80/share to clinch the deal with another sum of £400,000 as compensation for the other Hain partners. P&O sold 50% of the shares to the British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., and these two companies remained the sole shareholders. A further move by P&O saw an offer for majority of shares of London shipowner, Mercantile Steam Ship Co. Ltd by offering them £1.485 million through Hain in late 1917. The fleet was managed from 1918 by Hain and the remaining shares were purchased by 31st March 1923.
Although the ships were of the Hain Line, the company and ships were owned
by P&O.
By the way, grockel is a Devon word, meaning people who come from elsewhere and who have settled in the area - gets used in Cornwall too; emmets is a Cornish word meaning visitors ( in a very affectionate manner ) - neither are derogatory, just plain fact.
I am Cornish - lived in Penzance for last 64 years, and love it.
Best Wishes
Raymond
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
hello Treeve I am from East Cornwall ,my grandmother on my fathers side was from the South Hams Devon,so I suppose I can use both words
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Benjidog yes there is a word that the Spanish use it is GUIRIS from the word GHIRIGAY.
 

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Re: Tresillian.

I well remember hearing of this at the time (1954) but thank you all for the greater details. I don't know how many were lost with the ship, but I do know the Third Mate went down with her. He was one 'Wog' Strange who trained aboard HMS Conway between 1948 and 1950.
 

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If my memory isn't failing me when I was on the Nacella in the late 50's we had a 3rd or 4th Engr who was awarded the George medal for working the Liparus lifeboat engine etc.

Alex
 

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MV Tresillian

All,
I served my time in the Hain Steamship Company, starting in December 1958, so the loss of the Tresillian was in current knowledge.
The Senior Apprentice told me that rumoured cause was the "collapse of the feeder(s) in No. 4 Hatch due in no small part to the failure of the galley scupper over a long period during voyage, which allowed a large quantity of water into No. 4 Tween Deck caused the grain to swell thus wrecking the feeder".
Indeed to prove his point he filled a jar with wheat and then soaked it with water screwed the top on and put it in a locker and within a few days the jar had cracked and burst.
Further the Standard BOT Lifejackets(I think they were branded Victory) were then changed, in that the Kapok had to be in a polyethylene cover, as it was thought that the lifejackets were rendered ineffective once the fuel oil had contaminated the kapok.
Yours aye,
Slick
 

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slick said:
All,
I served my time in the Hain Steamship Company, starting in December 1958, so the loss of the Tresillian was in current knowledge.
The Senior Apprentice told me that rumoured cause was the "collapse of the feeder(s) in No. 4 Hatch due in no small part to the failure of the galley scupper over a long period during voyage, which allowed a large quantity of water into No. 4 Tween Deck caused the grain to swell thus wrecking the feeder".
Indeed to prove his point he filled a jar with wheat and then soaked it with water screwed the top on and put it in a locker and within a few days the jar had cracked and burst.
Further the Standard BOT Lifejackets(I think they were branded Victory) were then changed, in that the Kapok had to be in a polyethylene cover, as it was thought that the lifejackets were rendered ineffective once the fuel oil had contaminated the kapok.
Yours aye,
Slick
I must have been around about that time on Strick's Goulistan. I was 3rd mate and we were carrying a cargo of grain from Basra to Copenhagen. No shifting boards or feeders necessary-- I've forgotten what the excuse was- just fill her up from barges in the river. The loaders lived on deck during the loading period and slaughtered a goat from time to time, much to the mate's distress, who used to pass out at the sight of blood. The watchkeeping officers used to have to go down the holds to make sure that the grain was trimmed into all the corners. The grain dust used to give one a headache and there were these preying mantis things all over the place.

Fortunately, we got to Copenhagen without the bad weather although I can remember one night in the North Sea with visibility nil and one big deisel ship passing down in the other direction too close for comfort.

I was a "pool" officer and got overtime and the mate used to give it to me rather than to the 2nd mate, who was a contract man. I took all that was offered but left the company after the one voyage.

Split
 

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Hello Winton,

My grandad Sean Morgan was on the Liparus at the time of this incident and went out on a lifeboat to aid the crew of the Tresillian. He was awarded a Gallantry medal for saving life at sea.

Regards Sean
 

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Hi Guys on a lighter note re Treeves post with regards to the ownership of Hains. I was on the Treneglos in the Med and the 2nd Mate told me to run aft and dip the Ensign to the Canberra which was passing us going the other way towards Gib. When I got back to the Bridge I asked why? and he said it's the Commodore ship I said it's P.& O. and he replied yes but they own Hains so that's how I found out about it.

Regards Ron
 

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If my memory isn't failing me when I was on the Nacella in the late 50's we had a 3rd or 4th Engr who was awarded the George medal for working the Liparus lifeboat engine etc.

Greetings Alex,
just noticed this post of yours regarding the Tresillian's demise. I was actually aboard the Nacella when the mayday came in, steaming N thru the Irish sea, bound for Ellesmere Port for our usual cargo of tallow. It was a horrendous day, we were making about zero knots heading into the weather so were obviously unable to respond with any assistance. Maydays were coming in thick and fast from a number of vessels in distress, a sad day in maritime history....Ben
 

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Hello Winton,

My grandad Sean Morgan was on the Liparus at the time of this incident and went out on a lifeboat to aid the crew of the Tresillian. He was awarded a Gallantry medal for saving life at sea.

Regards Sean
Hi Sean. Long time since I visited this site. My father remembers Sean Morgan and also George Souter (Able Seaman). My father Brian Winton (Senior Ordinary Seaman) joined "Liparus" at Ellesmere Port 12:02:1954 and was paid off at Swanea 07:12:1954.
 

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Hello

This is the first time I've looked at this site... I was told about by a friend. My Dad (now pasted away) got a gallantry medal for saving lives reguarding the "Tresillian" has I never heard my Dad talk about this, I thought I'd ask anyone on this site for information... Many thanks
 
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