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Discussion Starter #1
I saw a photo posted the other day describing a tug as "hydroconic", I can't find the word in the dictionery can someone please tell me what it means?
 

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I think it has something to do with metal ship building. A company in England used the name as a trademark.
I will dig into it more.


I found this if it helps.

THESES (M.Sc.) -- Univ. of strathclyde, division of ship and marine technology, U.k., 1988
h t t p : / / d a t a b a s e . i r a n d o c . a c . i r
This study is concerned with developing a procedure for generating a developable surface with computer programs.A brief reveiw of the manual graphical approach is made and then a hydroconic hard chine hull form design procedure is carried out in order to take adveantages of the speed and precision of the computer. A design algroithm for such a hull is developed and with regard to the production aspect the equivalent flat plate shape outline is produced by author computer program. Finally a program to calculate the corresponding longitudinal centre of buoyancy for the generated hull form is produced.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks John I had a bit of a problem with some of the terminology but I did get the drift of it all, I'm grateful my friend
 

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Hydroconic hulls, used for tug and small craft, are basically a series of hard chines rather than a smooth curve. How someone came up with the idea, I don't know, but it was back in the 50's. Check the gallery for some pix and drawings if you haven't seen them already, and in my gallery, look at a picture of the tug Meeching (1960) on the gridiron at Newhaven, that shows the hull shape clearly. I'll see if I can get permission from our local museum to post a picture of Meeching's launch that also shows it.

I actually saw a small sailing yacht on a trailer a week or two ago, with a steel hydroconic hull. Never seen one before and couldn't get to my camera in time. :mad:

Andy G

PS. I don't know if it's a characteristic of all hydroconic tugs, but Meeching was 'lively' at sea. My Dad was her skipper when she rolled to 50 degrees in a force 9. She bounced back, though!
 

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I was skipper of a small tug built and owned by appledoreshipbuilders,on this design and we were out in a f8 and she rolled like a pig,but a good seaboat
 

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The Hydroconic principle as applied to hulls was patented by consultant naval architects Burness Corlett, and was licensed out to a number of builders at home and abroad. Some Aberdeen trawlers were built by Mitchison shipyard to this design.
 

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Interesting info here. John 236, would you say that your double chine hulls could be classed as hydroconic? I wonder what made Burness Corlett's design so different that they could patent it?

There's an unceremonious pict of the Meeching on a groyne off Oostende in the gallery of Marsat2. That shows the chines pretty well.

Andy G
 

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Not sure the legal aspect and how they managed to patent the idea, but I think the theory was that all plates could be developed as a function of a plain cone, without any double curvature.
 

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We had several trawlers in Granton built on the 'hydroconic' principle, they were
commonly refered to as ''Hydrocomic'' boats, though far from humerous when working in gale conditions.....................WLH
 

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My Dad would have loved the term Hydrocomic to describe Meeching's rolling. I looked at the museum today and the only photo of her launch is a press cutting that won't reproduce. In the musuem somewhere are the original b/w pix but they're not in the index file! I'll have another search. :mad:

That pic does show that she's a double chine design, as all the Harris tugs seem to be.

Andy G
 
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