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To answer 2 or 3 threads re Tyne Tees Shipping Company
Digger was Captain Stuart who yes did sport a white silk scarf and believe me he was a character in many other ways, I could almost write a book on him and his foibles a mannerisms. He was a difficult Captain to sail with as his pet problem was always the gangway. At times he might come back lateish at night and call the duty mate from his bunk to get the watchman to sort out gangway lashings, even when there was little wrong. I had been Mate with him on Netherlands Coast, the regular Captain, Eddy fisher must have been on leave and I was after i was given my first job as Master of The Novian Coast he came aboard with a present of an Cap with scrambled eggs on which he had bought for me. Also gave more some advice as to how I should handle the crew which although he was correct I shouldn't repeat.
 

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Captain Fisher, nor any of the masters had a Tyne pilot licence, Captain Fishers father and grandfather had been Trinity House Pilots on the London South Channel and were choice pilots For a well known deep sea shipping company. He was called to be a Thames Pilot and to follow in the family tradition but a few weeks before he was to join he had a motor bike accident which left hime with a severe limp and as such he would not have been able to climb pilot ladders. It was the disappointment of his life but he was a good seaman and ship handler and I learn a lot from about ship handling from him and some of the other Captains in Tyne Tees.
 

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their ships mainly 9/10 knots

[Most Tyne Tees vessels were about 9/10 knots although Netherlands and Iberian and Yorkshire Coasts managed 12 maybe 13 at a pinch. Even smaller vessels with the tide would tie up Piers to Quay in about an hour



QUOTE=Tony D;37968]Well one was a seafarer and we have a tendency for exageration., (*))
Yer right about the Pilot we only ever picked one up if we had passengers ,they tended to be young lads from the office who wished a few nights out in Amsterdam,once we had left the piers and submerged though they seldom left their cabins.
Mind you though ones memory grows dim one is sure Old Captain Fisher did it a bit swifter than a hour and forty five minutes,perhaps the waters of Tyne were a tad thinner then allowing a swifter passage.
(*))[/QUOTE]
 

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Tyne Tees Midlesborough.

I ran as Captain on various of their ships regularly to Tyne Tees Wharf and could write a book about the local watering holes. I knew Mr Mason very well. Although an excellent manager he was also a good friend. An excellent servant to the company but with a good heart and respect for the ships and their crews


Tyne Tees had a wharf on the Tees,next to the Fire Boat landing adjoining the Transporter Bridge. The site was managed by Gus Mason,probably a Director of the company,he was a short man but with a great sense of humour even to an Office Boy from another agents! Part of the site had the only public wine and spirit Bond 'Middlesbrough A Bond'....when this was closed after many years it transferred across the river as 'Middlesbrough B' and I was the fellow that ran it,amongst a 1000 other duties!
geoff
 

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tyne tees Midlesborough.

Without a doubt but that he would have been well rested as an officers well. When I was thinking of leaving Tyne Tees as the number of vessels was shrinking which would have meant me going back to Mate he was most upset about it. I fact he put forward a provision for the two of us to fund the purchase of one of our ships and he of course would have seen to the charter side. I was very tempted but had applied for Trinity House and if hadn't made the selection would probably have taken that route with him.
If I could motivate myself I could write absolutely an unbelievable account of my life on the Coast after deep sea. As E D H and A B 2nd mate, mate and master. A Life now long gone of sailing in all sorts some built in early 1900 and of seamanship and board of trade companions all characters in their own right. In a way a history which I should record because there aren't many old hands left.

Probably the earliest and most 'hard lying' a one of W G grace coasters, a veritable slum but happy times



[



QUOTE=Erimus;2825569]Nicely put Cb Pilot.....During the war he was seconded to the Dept. handling vessel movements,name forgotten at moment, he was under John Craddock who became chief water clerk at Constantines, and was Army Captain by rank.Whenever Gus Mason came into our office he would salute and say Good Day Captain Craddock sir! To which John would say stand down Private....This used to really p... the Management off!
Nice memories.
geoff[/QUOTE]
 

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Hi Geoff,
Iberian Coast Traded regularly between Newcastle and Hamburg/Bremerhaven.I had regular Captain ( name escapes for moment) who reluctantly took his leave so I never had the pleasure of being in command of her but did sail on her as mate. Lots of tales to tell about that also. Very bad passage once to Hamburg. Captain only Knew on way to go. Straight line on chart. took us over shallow water of Dogger Bank in about force 10 and sea so bad with heave sand content actual corrugated real deck housing. memorable !!
 

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Thanks Runrig. Will get on for this soonest. Much obliged to you. As the years slip by tend to live more with early memories of a great almost 50 years at sea and in pilotage. Just for your info. Worst feeder ever. Devon City, Smiths of Cardiff. All on back and water rationed. Happy memories
 
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