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She was indeed special and like you would not visit her in dwbaii Stephen, I have special memories of this vessel and don't want them tarnished. Only ship I've been on where I was accused of sloping off and sleeping in the khazi when I was walking around the eng room actually carrying out some watchkeeping and trying to figure out how it all worked.If my memory serves me right the head honcho in the TCR ( turbine control room) was Steve Constance and even though we got on allright I,m convinced he didn't believe me?
Hi Chris and Stephen I was on her when she was a steam ship yes Stephen you are correct immaculate white boiler suit but going to the ER come out black and back to you Chris there were a few primadonas in the ER department but they never bothered the carpenters department as they seemed to rule the ship but that's another story tony
 

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Hi Stephen I worked on the QE2 1977
She should go to the breakers, tout-suite! Good lines or not, the vessel is a has-been and will never be again.

QM - nearly thirty years ago, I went with my wife and a family friend who had gone to Europe on her, for her 15th birthday, around 1950. The friend remembered her cabin number and led us through the QM to show it to us. Unfortunately, it was in a closed off area. She did however, remember magnificently the layout, pool, restaurant etcetera. Yes, the QM still "has it".

(I was aghast with all the DC machinery - but that is another foible!)

Rgds.
Dave
 

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Taffe,

Apart from QE2, what other vessels did you sail in. How did you become a 'chippy'?

I am watching a series on YouTube by The Samson Boat Company. 134 30 minute films of the rebuild of the cutter 'Tally-Ho'. What this man and his crew are doing is unbelievable! Their skills are mind boggling These films have taken a derelict cutter and has renewed the complete vessel from keel to truck.

Tally Ho's King Planks (& more!) / rebuilding a wooden boat - YouTube ( A recent clip)


Stephen
 

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Meant to send this to Tony.... but to Taffe as well. I think anyone would find these clips interesting, 'Arm Chair Sailors & Chippies'!

Stephen
Hi Stephen first of all taffe65 was a engineer and a very good one by all means me myself was a time served shipwright who changed to er department I would like to point the mechanic job was so easy just seamed like I had been doing this all my sea career :)
 

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Taffe,

Apart from QE2, what other vessels did you sail in. How did you become a 'chippy'?

I am watching a series on YouTube by The Samson Boat Company. 134 30 minute films of the rebuild of the cutter 'Tally-Ho'. What this man and his crew are doing is unbelievable! Their skills are mind boggling These films have taken a derelict cutter and has renewed the complete vessel from keel to truck.

Tally Ho's King Planks (& more!) / rebuilding a wooden boat - YouTube ( A recent clip)


Stephen
I shall watch this with a glass of vin rouge and a nice cheese (caws).🧀🍷
 

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Good start to the week! I have been following these clips for about two years. As soon as a new one comes up on YouTube it pops up.
Traditional boat building with a twist. The twist is the people are using the most 'tools' and mostly powered tools, not available 100 years ago. Today they are doing this work with say a half dozen shiprights. A century ago there would have been a few dozen doing the work. That is why I wanted to 'chat' with Tony.

I hope as soon as the boat is afloat and rigged I would love to do a painting. I would be use traditional methods... brush and paints!

Stephen
 

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Hi Stephen first of all taffe65 was a engineer and a very good one by all means me myself was a time served shipwright who changed to er department I would like to point the mechanic job was so easy just seamed like I had been doing this all my sea career :)
Ships that I sailed in do not carry a 'mechanic', but the person who did that job was the Engineroom Storekeeper'? Yes? I was mostly in General Purpose crews. Names were difference. So, our ER Storekeeper or Carpenter would be in the book as Petty Officer. Like C.P.O. P.O. GP1, GP2, GPe etc.

OK, Shipwright. You were ' time served; as 'carpenter'?

Stephen
 

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Good start to the week! I have been following these clips for about two years. As soon as a new one comes up on YouTube it pops up.
Traditional boat building with a twist. The twist is the people are using the most 'tools' and mostly powered tools, not available 100 years ago. Today they are doing this work with say a half dozen shiprights. A century ago there would have been a few dozen doing the work. That is why I wanted to 'chat' with Tony.

I hope as soon as the boat is afloat and rigged I would love to do a painting. I would be use traditional methods... brush and paints!

Stephen
Ask away Stephen I still have my caulking hammer shipwrights term (whistler) and the 13 irons also my adz pilpn by mame razor Sharpe still to this day very proud of my shipwrights heritage and sailing on ships there was not many jobs I could not do so so proud regards tony
 

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Beautiful photo but something looks quite amiss with her approach and that very long, taut towline... never seen a liner come into a North River slip like that. Indeed, could she be berthing without tugs during one of the not atypical tugboat strikes?? The towline possibly on a winch on the pier??
Peter Kohler

The ship would off the pier at slack water. Try easing the vessel into the slip. The run a mooring line from the ship to the pier. No mooring boats. In this case, as the ship to coming along starboard to the berth, a lifeboat from the port side would put one done to run the lines. Later the lifeboat would be hoisted aboard,

No 'towline', a mooring rope would be used. Use the ship;s own capstan (on the ssUS they had those, rather than a deck winch.)

The important part of this, is the lack of a 'docking pilot'. The docking pilots are down by those who are run by the tug companies. No tug, no docking pilot! The river pilot would do the work. I'll bet they did not do that frequently. If he times the slack time perfectly.... easy. :cool:

Here is another photo of the same event.

Water Sky Boat Cloud Watercraft
 

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Tony.

If you want a good one for this evening, here is one that might give you a laugh.

BEST JOKE OF THE DAY! -
A monkey is sitting in a tree, smoking a joint, when a lizard walks past... The lizard looks up and says, "Hey, what are you doing?" The monkey says, "Smoking a joint, come up and join me!" So, the lizard climbs up and sits next to the monkey, and they smoke another joint. After a while, the lizard says his mouth is dry, and that he’s going to get a drink from the river. At the riverbank, the lizard is so stoned, that he leans over too far and falls in. A crocodile sees this and swims over to the stoned lizard, helping him to the side. He then asks the lizard, "What’s the matter with you?" The lizard explains that he was up in the tree, smoking a joint with the monkey and his mouth got dry... and that he was so wasted that, when he went to get a drink from the river, he fell in! The inquisitive crocodile says he has to check this out. He walks into the jungle and finds the tree where the monkey is sitting, finishing a joint. He looks up and says, "Hey, monkey!" The monkey looks down and says, "Dude!... " "How much water did you drink.... Dude?"

Stephen
 

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Tony.

If you want a good one for this evening, here is one that might give you a laugh.

BEST JOKE OF THE DAY! -
A monkey is sitting in a tree, smoking a joint, when a lizard walks past... The lizard looks up and says, "Hey, what are you doing?" The monkey says, "Smoking a joint, come up and join me!" So, the lizard climbs up and sits next to the monkey, and they smoke another joint. After a while, the lizard says his mouth is dry, and that he’s going to get a drink from the river. At the riverbank, the lizard is so stoned, that he leans over too far and falls in. A crocodile sees this and swims over to the stoned lizard, helping him to the side. He then asks the lizard, "What’s the matter with you?" The lizard explains that he was up in the tree, smoking a joint with the monkey and his mouth got dry... and that he was so wasted that, when he went to get a drink from the river, he fell in! The inquisitive crocodile says he has to check this out. He walks into the jungle and finds the tree where the monkey is sitting, finishing a joint. He looks up and says, "Hey, monkey!" The monkey looks down and says, "Dude!... " "How much water did you drink.... Dude?"

Stephen
Marvellous :ROFLMAO:.
 

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I was 11 when my parents and I emigrated from England to the US on the United States. We had 3 years previously visited, doing both crossings on THE Queen Elizabeth. Those crossings were perfect with lovely weather in mid-summer, my father got sunburned and food and service good, etc. I remember it well even though I was only 8. We traveled tourist class which was very basic - bunk beds, sink in the room, and communal bathroom. As for the United States, lovely stateroom and private bath BUT rough seas and very unpleasant crossing. We hardly left the cabin, I recall. Even excused from lifeboat drill because we were sea sick immediately, and my father was very proud of his sealegs so he was both psychologically and physically ill! He would venture out more than my mother and I and he always said that it was a 'bloody tugboat' compared to the Elizabeth and that he watched the stern go down one side, come up, then slew around and go down on the other side (landlubber terminology). Anyway, not surprising since US was a much smaller ship and an April crossing so North Atlantic was rough. Very very sad that the ship has been gutted and left to decay.
 

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Great reminiscences and beautiful photographs. It all reminds me of of watching, in 1971, alternating passages, up and down Southampton Water, of QE2 and France as they saw out the transatlantic services. Also, revived memories of crossing the Pacific and the Atlantic aboard SS America (as Australia), no less.
 

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Afraid not... none of the Queens... QUEEN MARY, QUEEN ELIZABETH or QUEEN ELIZABETH 2 ever came close to UNITED STATES' maiden voyage average speed of 35.59 (!) knots. Nor could FRANCE which was probably the second fastest liner in potential speed in the 1960s with ORIANA a close third. UNITED STATES' second fastest crossing was in 1966 when she was making up time after a strike... I'd have to rummage to find her speed but faster I think than even QM's records. Her potential maxiimum speed was reckoned to be around 42 knots although she would have probably rattled the fillings out of your teeth achieving that. Her top speed recorded on trials was 38.32 knots (!). By comparison, a TRIBAL-class destroyer was good for about 36 knots with a U-boat on its tail.

And to visually prove the point.....

Water Boat Watercraft Vehicle Naval architecture


Peter Kohler
 
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