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US Research ship topples over in Leith Drydock

3109 Views 32 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  Challisstern


3000 ton ship, but look at the top hamper. 21 in hospital.

The lawyers will be on the next available flight to get as much compensation from the contractor as they can.
How badly are you injured? I don't know until I have spoken to my lawyer.
All steel furniture, sharp edges, no carpets being a US vessel.

I see they didn't have to join the queue for an ambulance or a hospital appointment.
The HSE are not getting into a panic about yet.
Local councillor said, 'It would have been a terrifying experience for those on board' - how would he know.
Ships go over at 45 degrees all the time in heavy weather, but usually flip back to 45 degrees the other way.
How come a similar size of ship didn't go over next to it?

Large boat, large ship, no just a small ship.
See she is Sbd side to for a change. Considering the amount of side stays (if that is the correct term) that line the ships side and the drydock and the the stays along the bilge keels in the bottom of the drydock when they drydock a vessel it must have been a heck of a gust. It had been very windy last night and forcast 41 mph in the south.

They will have to flood the dock again to right her I assume and use tugs to ease her over.

Come on you salvage chaps, how would you do it?

I assume HMS Prince of Wales is in drydock, is she ok, didn't fall over? Apart from misaligned tail shaft. Oops. And we are picking up the bill on that one, not the shipyard. Twas ever thus.
Somebody promoted beyond his competence no doubt.馃が
Now she is a big ship and probably carries several big boats.
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Amassing ! Wonder what sort of bottom she had, as well as what tipped her?
!
In my book if she was chocked off correctly (having had due regard to her top heavy features) she should not have gone over.

One for the legal mafiosi I suspect.

BW
J :cool::cool:
Trust all are well!! Interesting ship, design wise, charter wise? Salvage job? insurance???
Trust all are well!! Interesting ship, design wise, charter wise? Salvage job? insurance???
Cockup!
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If you look closely you can only see 3 side chocks along the ships side. They are usually attached to the ship and sometimes the DD railings as well. The other ship in drydock looks as if its got extendable steel Acrows up against her side.
I would assume they were not in the process of drydocking her in those high winds.

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I assisted with the transfer of ownership and induction of the new crew when the vessel was transferred from Subsea 7 to Paul Allen in 2016 which took place in the same dockyard as yesterday鈥檚 incident occurred.
Find it hard to believe that a 鈥済ust of wind鈥 managed alone to topple the vessel which has been effectively in 鈥渓ay-up鈥 in that dockyard since 2020 and must have been subject to as strong if not stronger winds during this period without adverse effects. Has something i.e. distribution of weight within the vessel changed or was changing at the time contributing to the accident?
I remember that the PETREL has a high large windage area and is very top heavy, totally different to the other vessel in the d/d at the time.
Still I鈥檓 sure the MAIB will in due course release their findings. In the meantime hope the casualties make speedy recovery鈥檚
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The submersible which would be quite weighty may have been moved for work on it, though you would think that would have been removed pre drydock.
She is listing right way for the SW wind force to have an effect.
Maybe the Chief Steward took his wallet ashore that morning.
No doubt the OM's pre breakfast livener was shaken but not stirred.
There won't be a usuable glass left in the bar.
Is that called the 'Angle of Loll'? In the Naval Arch definition.
Sky Naval architecture Vehicle Asphalt Aviation

No chocks in the drydock bottom or hanging from the ships side apart from those two fwd. Perhaps they were removed for painting, though they usually reposition after painting and catch the area behind them later once its dried.
The props don't look as if they had been polished either, so not quite finished yet.
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Sincerely hope that the man rider basket was not occupied at the time although the paint scuttle spillage may suggest otherwise.

BW
J:cool::cool:
Black paint, probably painting the pods, didn't get round to the Stbd one.
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Drone footage, two ships in the same drydock which is quite normal for smaller ships, but 2nd one ok. That heli deck wouldn't have helped matters in the wind, just acted as a large sail. More top hamper on Petrel than the other ship.
The ROV.
Update by the chap in the US.
Somehow I cannot see them using cranes, just refloat her when the other ship is ready. 3000 ton is a big lump for a shoreside crane it would have to be a floating salvage crane, pushing her over she will slip off the keel blocks.
US owned by MS, registered in IOM and classed with Lloyds seems unusual, unless when it was with SUBSEA it was set up that way and was easier just to leave it be.
But once its part of US Navy they don't need class unless its going to be civilian operated, but then it would be ABS and registered in US. Built in Rumania he said, which has barely got access to the Black Sea as its wedged between Moldavia and Bulgaria.
They are obviously better at building ships than motorways as a couple of miles of Motorway from Bucharest took several years and hadn't reached anywhere. Seems it was a bit of a national joke.
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Good honest commentary.

Current Port of Registry (IOM ?) does not coincide with that on her stern. Anyone confirm what that is?

BW
J:cool::cool:
Good honest commentary.

Current Port of Registry (IOM ?) does not coincide with that on her stern. Anyone confirm what that is?

BW
J:cool::cool:
Good honest commentary.

Current Port of Registry (IOM ?) does not coincide with that on her stern. Anyone confirm what that is?

BW
J:cool::cool:
when the vessel was taken over from SUBSEA IN 2016 the vessel was registered in Luxembourg and this was changed to IOM along with the classification society.
The vessel was built in Norway not Bulgaria.

Steve
Good honest commentary.

Current Port of Registry (IOM ?) does not coincide with that on her stern. Anyone confirm what that is?

BW
J:cool::cool:
The number below the name is the vessels IMO number
Would the tanks have been pumped dry due to the long lay up? I was just thinking of bio gremlins in the diesel, doubt if she ran on heavy, being a series of large generators.
I suppose a set of deflections on all the generators once afloat wouldn't go amiss and a look round the foundations for cracking or anything untoward. Even foundation bolts for slackness or damage.
Putting everything back on line will have to be done a bit carefull as you don't know wgat strains various things took. A ship can roll 45 degrees but it rolls back , doesn't come to a stop.
The number below the name is the vessels IMO number
Not an IMO number for the vessel. 77 followed by letters is some other designation. US navy maybe?
IMO No. is 9268629 see attached data sheet.
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