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WAVERLEY is approaching her 30th anniversary of preservation,a marvellous achievement.This was taken in 1981 when she was undergoing reboilering when her original boiler was replaced.
Ahead of her can just be seen PRINCE IVANHOE the former Isle of Wight ferry SHANKLIN which sadly grounded and became a total loss.
 

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Of course the Shanklin's sister has recently passed to the breakers, the Southsea being towed to Esbjerg.

I spent a couple of months with the Waverley organisation as Assistant Purser back in 1986. At the tender age of 16 I found the paddler to be a delight to sail in, but she wasn't the happy ship the Balmoral was.

I had the luck to be assigned to the Balmoral for her first sailings in preservation, the most memorable being the run along the Gloucester Ship Canal when we took some of the swing bridges with us!
Rgds,
Justin
 

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I took an evening cruise on the River Thames yesterday (2nd October) aboard the preserved paddle steamer WAVERLEY and what a brilliant ship she is. (Applause)

A few photo's, would have taken more but the light faded very fast.

1. Approaching Tilbury landing stage.
 

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Bob S,

Thanks for posting your photographs. They are all excellent, however I particularly like the shot approaching Tower Bridge. All very nostalgic for me since I spent many a happy hour on the Clyde Steamers as a youngster.

Thanks again.
 

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This will start a debate no doubt. I've often seen Waverly credited to A&I Inglis shipyard but in fact she was built by Harland and Wolff at their Pointhouse yard. She was yard number 1330P launched 2nd October 1946 delivered 5th June 1947, 693 tons for London and North Eastern Railway Company. I'll keep my head down now. (Night)
 

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The Pointhouse yard belonged to Inglis and that's where the 'Waverley' was born.
H&W's Glasgow yard was across the river at Govan.
H&W did control Inglis from 1919 until the early sixties, but Inglis operated as an independent yard and never used the H&W name.

Bruce C.
 

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True but the vessels Inglis produced all were given Harland and Wolff yard numbers ending in "P" The Govan yard used the suffix "G". Even though Inglis didn't use the Harland and Wolff name this was only because of a private agreement between Lord Pirrie chairman of Harland and Wolff and George & James Inglis the last two members of the family on the board of the old company. They both retired in 1947 and never held directorships of Harland and Wolff which I believe disappointed them. Lord Pirrie felt he had gone far enough in agreeing they could keep the old company name and therefore denied them the usual directorships. A&J Inglis therefore wasn't really independant as it would appear and H&W definitely called the shots.
 

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What you're alluding to, the yard number, is strictly a minor bookkeeping matter. Personal relationships, real or imagined, private or public, between the corporate officials are interesting but always subject to conjecture and interpretation.
Both have absolutely nothing to do with the builder of record.
I suggest the next time you're on board the 'Waverley' you check the builder's plate.

Bruce C.
 

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The sad thing is that Waverley is in her present splendid condition thanks to the work of George Prior's Great Yarmouth yard and that firm has now also gone out of business.

Fred
 

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I'd a funny feeling my comments would touch a nerve somewhere, and it would appear I have succeeded. I have seen the builders plate on Waverly, your point being? Fine it indicates the yard she was built in my point was that yard was part of Harland and Wolff. White Star operated the Titanic, IMM owned it and more importantly paid for it. H&W underwrote Inglis operations covered the losses and took the profits ergo it was part of Harland and Wolff it certainly did not operate as a separate company. (I have the company accounts and minutes of board meetings) Shall we agree on a rose by any other name?
 

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Hi Gang,
Happy to see some people have managed to put a picture of my favourite river steamer onto the site.I 've tried without success to put a painting of the said vessel onto the site to no avail?I as a apprentice I helped construct the engines for the Waverley,I was then 17 years old. The company who built the engines and boilers was"Rankin and Blackmores---Eagle Foundry--Greenock, Scotland. They are no longer in business,but during their existance built many,triple ,quadruple and compound marine steam engines and boilers, In fact I think they built the worlds first free piston gas turbine. This is a little bit of forgotten information, Ingls built the engine,Rankins built the propulsion unit!So when you go aboard the Waverley whats the first thing you want to see?
Good Sailing
Neil Mac.
 

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Hereby an exceptional nice painting of this paddle steamer.
The information provided states the vessel was built by Inglis Ltd, Glasgow and took to the water in October 1946.
She replaced a previous vessel of the same name which was bombed and sunk with the loss of 300 men.
Originally coal fired , she had a triple expansion diagonal engine of 21,000 hp.
With a displacement of 693 tons on a length of 73.15 metres and with 1000 passengers on board she was designed to steam at over 16 knots.

It was the last paddle steamer to be built on the Clyde and in 1973 her own end seemed certain when she was withdrawn from service.
Fortunately for the 27 year old paddle steamer she was saved from the breaker’s yard.
The Paddle Steamer Preservation Society bought her for a nominal sum of One pound Sterling,
The ship is restored to her old railway company livery.

I am not drawn into an argument where the ship was built as I simply do not know and just more or less repeated the info I have.

Artist: John Gardner
copyright: Hempel A/S, Copenhagen 05/94

and Ruud: Got this one for you....
 

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Discussion Starter #16
TMac and Jan have hit the nail on the head both times.Great potted history Jan.Said it all in a few words exactly as it happened.Indeed Inglis' ships all received H&W yard nos with P suffix but it was a separate yard altogether opposite the parent yard at Govan.All swept away now with preparation for a new road and Glasgow/s new Transport and Maritime Heritage Museum as is Yorkhill Quay and Henderson/s Drydock for those who might remember them also.
 

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Waverly

Under Pirrie Harland and Wolff was a corporate raider in those days buying up rival shipyards simply to control them and untamately neuter them as effective opposition. They allowed Inglis to keep the name as H&W had every intention of closing the yard as soon as possible. Actually they did the same with Workman Clark here in Belfast and at one time cast a beedy eye towards Cammell Laird and even Swan Hunter. Harland and Wolff owned vast chunks of various shipping lines and Lord Kylsant was a particular confidant of Lord Pirrie. Together they made a formidable duo until the wheels fell off Royal Mail and the whole structure came crashing down. It's a long story but a truely fascinating one.
 

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neil maclachlan said:
Hi Gang,
I as a apprentice I helped construct the engines for the Waverley,I was then 17 years old. The company who built the engines and boilers was"Rankin and Blackmores---Eagle Foundry--Greenock, Scotland. Neil Mac.

Hi Neil, would you by any chance have known a brass finisher by name of Frank Lamont? He was about 5 foot 10, slim built with a shock of red hair.

My reason for asking is that he was my grandfather!

I always remember him telling me about building the engines for Waverley & Bristol Queen. The engine for Maid of the Loch came along a few years later too.

Best regards,

Alistair.
 

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Jan Hendrik said:
Hereby an exceptional nice painting of this paddle steamer.
The information provided states the vessel was built by Inglis Ltd, Glasgow and took to the water in October 1946.
She replaced a previous vessel of the same name which was bombed and sunk with the loss of 300 men.
Originally coal fired , she had a triple expansion diagonal engine of 21,000 hp.
With a displacement of 693 tons on a length of 73.15 metres and with 1000 passengers on board she was designed to steam at over 16 knots.

It was the last paddle steamer to be built on the Clyde and in 1973 her own end seemed certain when she was withdrawn from service.
Fortunately for the 27 year old paddle steamer she was saved from the breaker’s yard.
The Paddle Steamer Preservation Society bought her for a nominal sum of One pound Sterling,
The ship is restored to her old railway company livery.

I am not drawn into an argument where the ship was built as I simply do not know and just more or less repeated the info I have.

Artist: John Gardner
copyright: Hempel A/S, Copenhagen 05/94

and Ruud: Got this one for you....
Hi Jan, just a couple of wee corrections in your data: she was the last paddle steamer to be built for service on the Clyde, Maid of the Loch was also built at Pointhouse in 1952/53.

Waverley's engine is indeed a powerful piece of machinery but 21,000 hp is a trifle excessive, her indicated horse power is actually 2,100 which is sufficient to still push her to over 17 knots on occasions!

Alistair.
 
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