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Discussion Starter #1
Good to think back when we were little un,s
Just thinking back there to the hot sunny days of fifties,n,sixties when we sat on pavements picking tar off the ground and getting it all over face hands ,legs,then home,where the butter was waiting to rub on tar to remove it,lovely times,oh,and roasting my chestnuts by the fire.(K)
 

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No wonder our NZ Anchor butter was is great demand, for cleaning the tarred skin of young UK urchins.
We had to scour the dirt off with sand soap or Solvol

Bob
 

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Couldn't afford a coca cola with a dash of icecream from the dairy when I was young, so we used to buy a coke and drop a piece of tar in it to make our own frothy coke drink
 

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Discussion Starter #4
sandsoap

No wonder our NZ Anchor butter was is great demand, for cleaning the tarred skin of young UK urchins.
We had to scour the dirt off with sand soap or Solvol

Bob
,,,a remember green bars of sandsoap my parents had some in house at times,,quite pongy stuff.
 

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I remember when an asprin dropped into a Coke bottle was thought to induce an illicit thrill. Hunched together at the cafe table and sharing the bottle round. Thankfully it wasn't a gateway drug, because it did nothing.
 

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In those long gone days there was butter to rub off the tar with, because it was at the top of the food table with the other dairy products. Milk, cheese, butter, eggs were all promoted as healthy food. Thank goodness they are coming back again. After decades of others telling us what to eat, I am happily eating butter and drinking full cream milk again.
 

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In those long gone days there was butter to rub off the tar with, because it was at the top of the food table with the other dairy products. Milk, cheese, butter, eggs were all promoted as healthy food. Thank goodness they are coming back again. After decades of others telling us what to eat, I am happily eating butter and drinking full cream milk again.
That's the truth Norm - me too.

JJ.
 

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Could you use butter on Palm Line or was margarine compulsory?

Anchor butter was always regarded as second rate in our house, we used Dromona or Kerrygold.
 

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Here in Australia, due to the drought the supermarket home brand butter is coming from New Zealand, where the grass is green and lush.
 

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ES, butter was standard fare in Palm Line though the Unilever Animal Feed Pellets were good for roughage and passed as breakfast cereals !

Seriously, the best of the best was on the 4/8 when the pantries and galley came alive in the morning and toast (buttered) and marmalade was sent down to the pit.

David Wilson aka Cacique.
 

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Was in Kissy on Christmas day 1974. Worked a field day and when cleaned up found the beer fridge had stopped working, this and no Air Con made Jack very unhappy.
Into town steamed a Palm Line ship, Enugu I think, and we were invited over. The miracle of Christmas. And we were not interested in butter or roughage.
 

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Good to think back when we were little un,s
Just thinking back there to the hot sunny days of fifties,n,sixties when we sat on pavements picking tar off the ground and getting it all over face hands ,legs,then home,where the butter was waiting to rub on tar to remove (K)
Just as well you didn't do it in the 40's, you'd probably have got a slap instead, as each person was allowed only 2oz butter (or substitute - margarine, I stand to be corrected) per week and we weren't fussy either whose brand it was. Bread was half a loaf per week, still have my ration book somewhere, along with my wartime white identity card and my seaman's green identity card complete with finger prints. May be wrong but I think bread rationing did not come to an end until 1954
 

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Discussion Starter #16
ash,,, tooo

I remember when an asprin dropped into a Coke bottle was thought to induce an illicit thrill. Hunched together at the cafe table and sharing the bottle round. Thankfully it wasn't a gateway drug, because it did nothing.
also they put cigarette ash out of the ashtrays in coke,to try and get buzz.(Smoke)
 

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During the war years (40’s) butter was delivered in barrels to the local co-op.
Remember the grocer with large wooden paddles knocking it into small pats of butter ready to sell.
Used to collect the barrel staves to make kindling for the fire.
Davie
 

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This brings recall of chewing that soft pitch from the roadways - during the war we pretended it was chewing gum . . . a wonder we lived!**

While waiting to start Marine College I had a job as a Coop errand boy. Part of the job was packing up sugar, butter and lard:

For eighteen shillings per week I deliver grocery orders. I ride a heavy grocery bike, with a huge basket on the front. When not making up orders and cycling about the streets with them, I weigh sugar and flour into different-sized paper bags and am proud of the neat job I make of folding in the tops. In 1953, sugar comes in two-hundredweight jute sacks (one-tenth of a ton) – it is barely within my strength to drag them from the storeroom. Butter and lard arrives in blocks and must be cut up, weighed and wrapped in greaseproof paper, in half and quarter-pound portions; I make up tiny, two-ounce packets of butter for pensioners of meagre means.
 

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Hot buttered scrumptious toast......heaven !
In my youth when Long John Silver had an egg on his shoulder we used to buy fresh bread from the local baker. The loaf was warm, and it had a seductive yeasty smell. The toast made with it in front of the fire with toasting forks was crisp and the butter on it melted down one's chin. Now the only bread I can buy is prepared in mass-production bakeries; it has the consistency of wet cardboard and it has no particular flavour or odour. Toasting it results in a material that could be used to armour plate tanks, but it turns immediately to mush if any butter gets within six feet of it.

I firmly believe that many of the problems with the youth nowadays is that they never delighted over the tea and hot buttered yeasty toast! (Jester)
 

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Using butter to clean tar off children's flesh would not have occurred in the early 50s when rationing was very much in force and all one recieved was a coupon for two ounces a week.My sister and I never having had much memory of pre-war times happily ate marg allowing our mother to enjoy the full butter ration. Yes, we were sweet kids!

Nick
 
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