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On steam ships we sweated gallons ( Engineers )
We had a wooden "Pani " ( water ) bucket for the engineer officers of the watch which held something more than a gallon which was repenished by the " Tail Wallah " ( oiler ) at least 2times if not 3 times a watch East of Suez. This was in addition to the 3 or 4 "tea breaks " we indulged in . Always a big bottle of Salt Tablets on the E/R Desk !
If your sweat didnt have a salty taste then time to consume a few " Salties "
One of Brocks vessels lost a 5 th Engineer in the Red Sea due to a combination of heat exhaustion ( Lack 0f Salt ) amd he also apparentley had Astma . He was buried at sea .
My Kids still dont believe we had to drink about a gallon and a half pof water per watch and take the salt tablets .
In the dining saloon there was always bottles of salt tablets on thetables at all meal times .
The worst thing however was " *****ley Heat " which was a very bad Itch all over the body and the only thing which would reliev it " Temporarily " was a hot shower .
It took months to get rid of it !!!

Oh Happy Days ?????????????????????
Takes me back Roger to SS Maihar. Adjusting clearances on bottom end brgs in Massawa was no fun. Tindal's remedy was never drink ice water Sahib, just sup from the can hanging in the engine room, did the trick too.
 

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On SS Manipur we could never understand why we were losing feed water from our storage tanks and I think we had a distilled water storage tank up in the casing, then we noticed it was venting good old steam from vents up on the boat deck, mind you at 137F in the engine room, I am not surprised.
 

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Steam Engineers

I sailed on the P.S.N.C. Kayeson which had two 4 oil fired burners controlled by a Somalian donkeyman (no English) located behind the manouvering consol with a similar set up in that the watch keepers adjusted the speed according to the bridge telegraph orders. we had two turbinesHP & LP the juniors job was mainly to watch the boiler gauges during manouvering while the lecky kept the log after full away it was just the usual maintainance of the various pumps steam up and downers as well as electric pumps check temps on the turbo alternator bearings dodge the steam leaks (superheated steam leaking is no joke as you cant see it and it can cut through skin and bone no problem) when in port for maybe just a few hours the engineers operated the cargo pumps manually 1st open the steam valve to warm the pumps through and hand crank the oil pump on the pump as required bty the deck officer as req. pumps located on the same flat as the turbines and as you can imagine it was very humid most times, pump the bilges leaving the oily residue of course, it would not do to discharge the oil overboard now would it. Being a Hastie's man I was given the job of checking the levels of the steering gear.Plug the condenser tubes clean the desalinator of lime and on a good trip you got to do a boiler clean. Then of course you got to sleep of a run ashore Usually out of sight behind the switcboard. Kayeson was a steam tanker sister ship to the william wheelright
I was also on the Kayeson. and WW. 1973-76
 

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Well, well gentlemen, as steam engineers! Do remember your 2nd class orals, the examineer asking what would you do, how would you do it?
Then there is the voyage from hell!, and ones ability with others to remember how it is done?
A trip fresh from drydock, water making plant for boiler water on the bugle, on a hp water tube boiler superheated plant 600psi 800 degrees f, and a hp lp turbine geared engine.
More steam was the shout from the chief in the stokehold, whoosh was the reply from the boilers, fires blownout,steam pressure nonexistant. Emergency diesel fired up, lub oil relief valve problem, bearing seizure. Black out, hurrah!!.
Dkesel air startbottleno pressure die start failedto start. Dead ship.
Now the orals, boilers to repair, settling tanks to drain. Ok so far? Check line up the deisel fuel storage tank withe fuel to boilers, via the hand operated fuel pressure pump, then the fd fans to by pass, open natural air intake vents? Fill the boilers by hand by bucket,, by taking off safety valves, after filling replace safety valves. Isolate all steam auxilay linesand superheat lines except to turrbo feed pump, and a ta! Self condensing unit! and main condenser,. Check discuss understand light burner in furnace 1 burner raise steam, when up to pressuree, openup steam to turbo feed pump and ta, then everyone to stations. Feedpump started, ta wound up and put on the board! Then the condenser pumps and sea water pump started. Then flash up and join second boiler [ also whoosed] review. Start fd fans and boiler fuel pumps [ stillon diesel]
auxilary steam lines and plant slowly bring back to service, and pUt boilers on heavy fuel.
Sort out water making plant, and storage desalinated boiler water.
Then pray!! slow journey to port of refuge. The steam plant was adapted and the answers were not the same as in the orals? But my undies where the same colour brown!!!
 

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Well, well gentlemen, as steam engineers! Do remember your 2nd class orals, the examineer asking what would you do, how would you do it?
Then there is the voyage from hell!, and ones ability with others to remember how it is done?
A trip fresh from drydock, water making plant for boiler water on the bugle, on a hp water tube boiler superheated plant 600psi 800 degrees f, and a hp lp turbine geared engine.
More steam was the shout from the chief in the stokehold, whoosh was the reply from the boilers, fires blownout,steam pressure nonexistant. Emergency diesel fired up, lub oil relief valve problem, bearing seizure. Black out, hurrah!!.
Dkesel air startbottleno pressure die start failedto start. Dead ship.
Now the orals, boilers to repair, settling tanks to drain. Ok so far? Check line up the deisel fuel storage tank withe fuel to boilers, via the hand operated fuel pressure pump, then the fd fans to by pass, open natural air intake vents? Fill the boilers by hand by bucket,, by taking off safety valves, after filling replace safety valves. Isolate all steam auxilay linesand superheat lines except to turrbo feed pump, and a ta! Self condensing unit! and main condenser,. Check discuss understand light burner in furnace 1 burner raise steam, when up to pressuree, openup steam to turbo feed pump and ta, then everyone to stations. Feedpump started, ta wound up and put on the board! Then the condenser pumps and sea water pump started. Then flash up and join second boiler [ also whoosed] review. Start fd fans and boiler fuel pumps [ stillon diesel]
auxilary steam lines and plant slowly bring back to service, and pUt boilers on heavy fuel.
Sort out water making plant, and storage desalinated boiler water.
Then pray!! slow journey to port of refuge. The steam plant was adapted and the answers were not the same as in the orals? But my undies where the same colour brown!!!
11 days adrift, hand tools only in and out of the boiler plugging tubes, from plugs in er spares store, luckily we had enough plugs,
 

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On steam ships we sweated gallons ( Engineers )
We had a wooden "Pani " ( water ) bucket for the engineer officers of the watch which held something more than a gallon which was repenished by the " Tail Wallah " ( oiler ) at least 2times if not 3 times a watch East of Suez. This was in addition to the 3 or 4 "tea breaks " we indulged in . Always a big bottle of Salt Tablets on the E/R Desk !
If your sweat didnt have a salty taste then time to consume a few " Salties "
One of Brocks vessels lost a 5 th Engineer in the Red Sea due to a combination of heat exhaustion ( Lack 0f Salt ) amd he also apparentley had Astma . He was buried at sea .
My Kids still dont believe we had to drink about a gallon and a half pof water per watch and take the salt tablets .
In the dining saloon there was always bottles of salt tablets on thetables at all meal times .
The worst thing however was " *****ley Heat " which was a very bad Itch all over the body and the only thing which would reliev it " Temporarily " was a hot shower .
It took months to get rid of it !!!

Oh Happy Days ?????????????????????
Didn't need to be on a steamer to get *****erly heat. I liked the chocolate coated salt tablets. - scrape the chocolate off and dump the salt ?
 

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#239 • Jul 18, 2012 SteamBloke keyed: " In the early 70s I was a Junior Engineer on ships running thru the Pacific. I suffered from PH until my first home leave and my grandfather (also an ex marine engineer) advised me to carefully rinse my boiler suits after washing. He said that any soap left on the boiler suit would exacerbate the PH. I followed his advice and problem solved."

Correct we had Maytag brand wringer washers. Generally after washing boiler suits we dumped the whole machine load of soapy water then refilled with plain water. Usually we did this twice until the water remained clear after rinsing.

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1965 I was the 12-4 Oiler on SS George M Humphrey on the Great Lakes. My watch engineer Jim McKillip tended to spend the open lake watches sitting in the air conditioned engine room office reading a paper back book. Jim taught me a lot over our 1964-65 period.

So @ 0200 one night the Chief Engineer Louie Vieu came down the engine room to find Oiler me testing the boiler water. Louie did not say a word to me, just got his coffee mug, filled it then took it with him to the ER Office. Awhile-later Louie came back down, rinsed out his coffee mug and said to me "keep up the good work" then went topside.

January - March 1966 I took the Cleveland, Ohio Lake Carriers Association Marine Engineers school. A part of the USCG test was to demonstrate that we knew how to test boiler water. The USCG had a variety of boiler water test cabinets commonly found on the Great Lakes. Each cabinet was supplied with a 500-ml glass bottle filled with boiler water USCG got somewhere.

I went right to the Drew Chemical Corp cabinet and went to work. At one point the USCG guy came by and said to me "it looks like you have done this before"? "Oh, yeah, says me". There were applicants that had no idea where to start or how to do it. Learning by doing was a wonderful thing.
 

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kewi, all I remember from the testing was phenallphlene.
 

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I sailed with the Ben Line in the early sixties as a cadet on the Benattow and suffered with *****ly heat. There was a brand called Asepso soap carried in the ship's stores which contained mercury that did the trick. I don't suppose it is allowed nowadays as 'Elf and safety would have banned it. The Chief Engineers bathroom had an iced water tap and that was being used constantly, filling enamel pitchers to wash down the salt tablets
Hi rowantree, Wasn't the Bennatow previously the Cuzco with PSNC? I sailed on her in 1959-60, as a first-tripper 2nd 6th Engineer, then 1st 6th on my second trip. 400psi water tube d-type Foster Wheelers, in same engine room space as the steam turbine. They announced the end of National Service about 2 weeks into my first voyage - great celebration, but had to remain as plenty to pay off uniform costs. BP33 per month - seems ridiculous. Then on to Port Auckland of Port Line, with pay down to BP29 per month, but much easier conditions. I left the sea after that trip, but look back with affection to the learning experience, both of engineering and of life. We had a galvanised bucket with a built-in dangerous heating element, which we used to boil up our overalls after the 12-4 watch - quite effective in cleaning them, and they dried in minutes when hung in the ER. Took a deck-cargo of Leyland buses to Havana on second trip - they liked the buses but not we seafarers!
 
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