Ships Nostalgia banner

341 - 360 of 372 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,284 Posts
Overtuk was Overdone!

First trip JR/O was Texaco Denmark and then first trip ECO was Texaco Spain. But by then I thought I had already seen the light - the rich oil companies certainly had better accommodation (day-cabins even) but wrt the E in ECO thought, vainly in my case, that they were buying an R/O who would not start drinking until after dinner' Paid more for the same job and bored us silly. By the end of Conoco Europe, where they knew a little but not much better, I knew I had and was most pleased to get back to Denship (if occasionally Speedholm) where a proper job was on offer (semiconductors the size of your fist, boiler suits, swarfega, everyfink).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,399 Posts
Texaco Denmark, April 72 to August 72, a happy ship.

Never understood peoples love of boiler suits, regarded it as a bit of a fetish and as for swarfega...... two uses and only one of them was cleaning hands. Semiconductors, was that all the oul mumbo-jumbo about p/n junctions, another question to avoid in electrotech.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,284 Posts
Had you eschewed the elegant 1 MW banks of thyristors (4 junction devices) on the GTVs then you would have had to embrace the Paxman, the only other way of providing these beauties with electrickery.

THEN you would have understood the love of boiler suits and Swarfega (principal mode).

I left Texaco Denmark after her brush with the breakwater at Zeebrugge in late '71 so missed you by some months. My first trip so a little boggled by 'things' but certainly not unhappy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,399 Posts
A thyristor is a solid-state semiconductor device with four layers of alternating N and P-type material. It acts exclusively as a bistable switch, conducting when the gate receives a current trigger, and continuing to conduct while the voltage across the device is not reversed (forward-biased). A three-lead thyristor is designed to control the larger current of its two leads by combining that current with the smaller current of its other lead, known as its control lead. In contrast, a two-lead thyristor is designed to switch on if the potential difference between its leads is sufficiently large (breakdown voltage).

For me peak electricity was understanding Ward-Leonard gear, is it still popular?

I will bow down to no man regarding my pain in dealing with Paxman RPH engines. I was Chief on and later superintendent for 5 ships each with 3 Paxman engines driving main alternators. The scars remain and you were correct, swarfega was popular, and bought in bulk, we were a VIP customer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,284 Posts
Tick VG, although there is a minimum holding-on current and at college it was drilled into us that it was either a reversal of voltage or of current that caused it to switch off (how the current could go the wrong way, well fortunately no one put that in the exam papers).

Nor did they explain why, when it cannot provide reactive power (obviously, thyristors only pass DC) the inverter requires about as much reactive power itself as the load is taking at any given time requiring a separate source of KVAr about twice the KVAr capacity of the shaft machine/inverter combination.

It is better not to admit to these shortcomings when being interviewed for employment or advancement but now they are interesting (when, of course, my brain is less and less likely to follow the explanation - the nice guys at Taiyo did try to explain it to me when I was shown their little look-alike).

Your torture could have been worse. If I remember right Texaco Denmark had a Rolls Royce emergency diesel generator. If you'd been a really, really wicked Chief you could have had them for auxiliaries. Then you'd have needed lead curtains to catch the bits as they did in-flight self-disassembly. I have only seen where such used to be, never where they were still fitted.

I should have added. Ward Leonard. Last seen on Broompark's Clarke Chapman gear. They made their own MG Set drive motors and after thirty years in the chair these remained the only ones in any of the company fleets to experience rotor bar failure. Buy your motors from someone who is main stream 'in the game'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,399 Posts
Growing up RR were an icon of British industry. Jet engines and of course the Merlin piston engine also the cars made in Crewe/
In a span of two years in the early 70's the RB 211 bankrupted RR and then I sailed on the Texaco Denmark with an abortion of a RR diesel engine. Germans, our European partners, own RR Motors. Another childhood wistful balloon burst.
Move this post into the nostalgia top twenty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
A thyristor is a solid-state semiconductor device with four layers of alternating N and P-type material. It acts exclusively as a bistable switch, conducting when the gate receives a current trigger, and continuing to conduct while the voltage across the device is not reversed (forward-biased). A three-lead thyristor is designed to control the larger current of its two leads by combining that current with the smaller current of its other lead, known as its control lead. In contrast, a two-lead thyristor is designed to switch on if the potential difference between its leads is sufficiently large (breakdown voltage).

For me peak electricity was understanding Ward-Leonard gear, is it still popular?

I will bow down to no man regarding my pain in dealing with Paxman RPH engines. I was Chief on and later superintendent for 5 ships each with 3 Paxman engines driving main alternators. The scars remain and you were correct, swarfega was popular, and bought in bulk, we were a VIP customer.
RFA Fort class had eight V12 Paxmans (12RPH CZ) for generators, and their Rover class had ten V8s, including cargo pumps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
RFA Fort class had eight V12 Paxmans (12RPH CZ) for generators, and their Rover class had ten V8s, including cargo pumps.
The firm I worked for at one time, Bestobell, somehow had the contract to maintain the AVR's on all or some the Rover Class alternators.
Also, equally strangely, we had the contract to maintain the side scan sonar system used by MoD to search for the remains of crashed Sea Kings and the like, this being kept in the salvage depot at Swanmore.

On my first and only visit to a Rover, down in Plymouth, I must say I found the layout a touch unusual, with the switchboard and paralleling/metering arrangement being a little congested compared to what I was used to with BP.

No doubt this was not a problem when you were used to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
"Things were easier in the RFA, didn't you have a Chinese Laundryman to wash your boiler suits."

I would say it's not about how you got them clean, but about how you got them dirty.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,284 Posts
Good response, Steve, but I think you two should stop airing your laundry (whatever its state) in public. I think ES is not beyond coupling your Chinese laundryman with Swarfega.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Took over a Pan Ocean Anco product carrier when working for Silver Line,the fact it was in drydock in Rotterdam said it all,what a heap,it was the same vessel that ended its days in the shat-el-arab river where the legendary John Snow assisted in the rescue of the crew and a number of wives on board.(Cloud)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
difficult to answer, one could have a clockwork ER, and yet the crowd, watchmates could be *****es? It is not a simple matter of some old Shone t heap, all though of these if one looked carefully there could be many.
Being a tanker man with unexpected discharge and loading ports, all within 24 -36 hours after sometimes a 30 day voyage, made one wish for a change of scenery. Even the arabs at or in the Suez Canal zone were a welcome relief.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
528 Posts
difficult to answer, one could have a clockwork ER, and yet the crowd, watchmates could be *****es? It is not a simple matter of some old Shone t heap, all though of these if one looked carefully there could be many.
Being a tanker man with unexpected discharge and loading ports, all within 24 -36 hours after sometimes a 30 day voyage, made one wish for a change of scenery. Even the arabs at or in the Suez Canal zone were a welcome relief.[/QUOTE

I always found that when people are under pressure there isn't time for the "why was there no marmalade for breakfast six months ago" arguments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
The Eyties feature quite often this thread, wonder why.(Jester)
 
341 - 360 of 372 Posts
Top