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The Eyties feature quite often this thread, wonder why.(Jester)
Funny you should mention that - I'm on board a 7 year old ship that I took over from Italians earlier this year. She, and 3 others, 1 sister ship & 2 smaller vessels that we took over at the same time, all have one recurring theme - very little real maintenance had been done, (although the records looked good...), and what had been done appears to have been carried out with <ahem> "Ali Baba" parts... (Cloud)

All had been run by the same outfit from new build...
 

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On ours the electrical system was poor to say the least, the steel work we reckon was made up of old tin cans and Lancias.
The steel work was so poor that the bottom fell out of the M/E L/O cooler, and when we attempted to use the main circ. on bilge suction they pumped not a lot, on inspection at Falmouth all that was found in the pumps was a few jagedy shards of impeller, how we maintained vacuum goodness only knows.

However, being Italian they looked great, some say the best looking in the fleet, of course that was in the days when BP actually had a fleet flying the Red Duster.
And drink lots of cold beer.
 

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There was a firm called Aerodev I think it was, they produced chemicals that could return motors to usable condition subsequent to them being flooded with salt water, they must have made a fortune out of the Eyties.

Also the art of drying out motors with electric welding gear came in handy.
 

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Rochem had a similar product which was used extensively by Red Duster ships. The Eyties, as you so playfully call them, did not have a monopoly on stupidity or bad luck.
 

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Mine was the Esso Durham in 1969, in which I was the J2/E. At the time, we were told, she was overdue a refit/scrapping/scuttling, and mechanically she was a mess. But there was the Biafran war going on in Nigeria, and it might be possible to get the last dregs of oil out of there before the whole place closed down.

Perhaps I am misjudging our owner, but it was tempting to believe that if our mighty vessel were lost it might save a few bob in refit or scrappage costs. Anyway, off to Nigeria where, on the way, everything that could go wrong did. Then arrival in Nigeria after several stops at sea, the usual call from the bridge to start the cargo pumps (all steam turbine pumps). I went down onto the cargo pump flat and started the first two, but opening the steam valve on #3 resulted in the Bibby coupling between the turbine and the pump disintegrating, causing the shafts to ride over each other and blowing the whole thing apart in a surge of superheated steam.

Fortunately the steam valve was isolated by the steam and exhaust pipes, so the blast of steam and whatever else missed me. Even so, the whole flat filled immediately with steam, and I had to crawl out on the deck plates until I found the ladder up to the control flat. Once there, and mouthing expletives that I didn't know I had memorised, the chief engineer greeted me. "F**k me Sec, we thought you were dead for sure!"

It's refreshing when your superior officers have such concern for oneself!
I was also on Esso Durham in 1969, sailing as junior engineer and it was certainly the biggest heap of crap I ever set foot on. It seemed to be one long procession of black-outs, boiler tube failures and never having enough distilled water. On one occasion we were about to go into Bonny to load and someone phoned down to say that althought there was steam at the aft winches, they wouldn't run. The second twigged that the exhaust valve in the shaft compartment must have been left shut and sent me down to open it. As soon as I started doing this, it set off the most alarming crashing and banging from water hammer, so I went back to the engine room to ask for the steam to be shut off first. The second said no and just go and do it. The valve was up close to the deckhead and there was a short ladder provided to get at it, so I meekly did as I was told and tried to ignore the banging until there was one extra big bang and the valve just seemed to blow up in front of me. This caused me to fall back down the ladder and onto the plates, with the valve cover, wheel and spindle still in my hand. The outrush of boiling water fortunately missed my face but my left arm had caught a hefty dollop and was hurting like hell. I went back to the control platform where I found the second was jumping up and down and wondering where the auxiliary condenser vacuum had gone. I threw the remains of the valve down at his feet and told him less than politely what he coul do with his vacuum. Seeing that I had been hurt he sent me up for medical attention. One might think I would have got a day or two off after this experience but no such luck - I was back down again that evening although I had been put on 'light duries', which basically meant minding the shop and getting the log in. I eventually lost nearly all the skin off that arm.
 

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There was a firm called Aerodev I think it was, they produced chemicals that could return motors to usable condition subsequent to them being flooded with salt water, they must have made a fortune out of the Eyties.

Also the art of drying out motors with electric welding gear came in handy.
Ah, Aerodev! It sort of worked . We had a ship in Rio that ended up with >8 meters of water in the engine room and we flew all the motors and switchgear back to the UK for Aerodev to do their magic on. The ship was sailing again after only 6 weeks. The biggest on-going electrical problem was the cabling but it could have been worse as we had been a little fortunate there because a lot of the terminations had lots a spare that could be cut back to the good stuff. About 15 years later can across a firm in Aberdeen, ESL, who seemed to work without fancy chemicals but had large hot distilled water baths they dunked the stuff into followed by very careful drying . They did 3 alternators for me and they came out just fine
 

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Ah, Aerodev! It sort of worked . We had a ship in Rio that ended up with >8 meters of water in the engine room and we flew all the motors and switchgear back to the UK for Aerodev to do their magic on. The ship was sailing again after only 6 weeks. The biggest on-going electrical problem was the cabling but it could have been worse as we had been a little fortunate there because a lot of the terminations had lots a spare that could be cut back to the good stuff. About 15 years later can across a firm in Aberdeen, ESL, who seemed to work without fancy chemicals but had large hot distilled water baths they dunked the stuff into followed by very careful drying . They did 3 alternators for me and they came out just fine
Tim
I remember Aerodev well. It was good stuff.
I went to work on a sugar estate in Mocambique after I came ashore and during the annual mill shutdown we dunked all the main motors in hot distilled water to get rid of the airborn sugar residue they sucked in. It worked a treat, and with slow -very slow- drying out and varnishing they never took any harm at all.
Roger.
 

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as apprentice armature winder at william cable we used the now dreaded carbon tech for washing drowned motors and slowly drying them out in a huge oven, had very clean hands after use, and most motors regained their insulation readings enough to be varnished again
 
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