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Discussion Starter #1
Since I have retired I have had, and/or,still have :-

2 frozen shoulders, left and right.

Hernias x 2

Bigger bouts of depression.

C.Diff

Probably need stents in my leg blood vessels.

and being checked out for a pacemaker (ironically moving and the new kitchen was going to have an induction hob)

The last 2, together with my type 2 diabetes, probably explains why, in retrospect, for the last five years of work I was not on the best of form workwise.

I guess it was only relaxing that brought these things to the forefront.

This is not a whinge, just wondering if others have experienced similar.
 

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yep sounds right even though I'm still working!
Just been diagnosed with depression.
Have a perpetual bad back from an accident in Durban when I was 23.
Neck sore when you twist.
Doesn't stop me climbing a pilot ladder or doing my job but I'm knackered at the end of the shift!
 

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yep sounds right even though I'm still working!
Just been diagnosed with depression.
Have a perpetual bad back from an accident in Durban when I was 23.
Neck sore when you twist.
Doesn't stop me climbing a pilot ladder or doing my job but I'm knackered at the end of the shift!
That reminds me of your sore neck could be fused bones in your spine . I got those bending over chart tables so I was told
 

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I'm Ok------

----'til I wake-up!
It's downhill from there!
My knees are my biggest problem.
Probably loading 16 tons, (160 bags) of corn onto my Atkinson, (AEC 9.6L engine), eight-legger, humping 16 stone, (2 cwt.), bags of corn off an elevator, onto my shoulders two/three times a day started the destruction of them!

I should have had them replaced yonks ago but never got round to it. Probably too ancient now at 82, (is there a cut-off age for the op.?), so I'll soldier on. Phil
 

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Reminds of the saying after a night on the pop - 'took one look at you and makes me feel great' lol

Like low cost airlines counting passengers onboard - they count the empty seats rather than the occupied seats. Me, I now count the bits that still work rather than those that dont!

BUT my money is on that you would do it all over again?
 

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Oh Sh*t, you've all had so many woes on this mortal earth, you're assured of a place in heaven relaxing on a sofa being fed grapes by nubile maidens and your every wish granted. Where alas! being an octogenarian and still dancing I shall be shovelling coal to keep my mates warm, unless I can get a discount for 22 months in plaster after being hit by 3500 kgs of steel. If I can get a discount I'll forgoe the grapes! [=P]
 

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I was a very heavy smoker for 25 years and has 13 years breathing asbestos dust and fumes from Doxford top piston blow-by, crankcases, purifier flats and those nasty chemicals dosing the F.W. ESD3 feed water and yet I've got to 76 with only my hearing a bit impaired(A) This despite being topped up with regular short bursts of the nasties for the following 40 odd years.
I guess I have been one of the very lucky ones.
 

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I worked for Marconi for 42 years and only had 4 days sick leave in that time. Within 18 months of retiring I was diagnosed with bowel cancer and then liver cancer (it had spread from the bowel). Since then I have had prostate cancer and a tumour on my scalp (should have worn that uniform cap at sea, instead of keeping it on top of the wardrobe in my cabin). Am currently waiting to sample the joys of cystoscopy for the first time so that they can investigate the damage done to my plumbing by the radiation therapy that killed off the prostate cancer.

So I can agree that retirement isn't all sunshine and honey but I suspect that it is a lot better than taking your chances with St Peter. That is an appointment that I am hoping to postpone for quite a few years yet.

I am still as mobile as I was before I retired, so can get to the pub or wherever I want without needing any help or encouragement. I don't enjoy housework or gardening but am prepared to put up with them (sometimes very reluctantly) because I do appreciate the end-result.

After retirement, as before retirement, life is a mixed bag and it is the luck of the draw whether you pull out a goody or a forfeit. Whatever your luck, there is not really any alternative than to accept and make the best of it that you can. Many of my friends and former colleagues have crossed the bar and are no longer in a position to make that choice.
 

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Unlike old soldiers, old mariners do pay off and leave this mortal soil but with a mass of experiences that very few others could hope to find in today's world.

Bob
 

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, old mariners do pay off and leave this mortal soil but with a mass of experiences that very few others could hope to find in today's world.

Bob
We certainly sailed in the best years 40's to late 60's, crap ships, good ships, slow ships, fast ships, good feeders, bad feeders, heavenly ports and delights, ports you never wanted to visit again. Enjoyed my tramping days the best, the uncertainty of it going to ports off the beaten track, never could get a full Discharge Book though with trips of 10 t0 22 months. Although at times wished I was somewhere else, I never regretted a moment of it, there were times I didn't like it, but if you don't have the bad situations you don't appreciate the good times, and time spent in a seafaring career certainly equipped you for handling most sh*t that life threw at you. You never found the camaraderie in a shore job. We all have our disagreements on here, but if at sea and one of us was in trouble, we'd have a tarpaulin muster to help them out, even if they were the ship's asshole. (Smoke)
 

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Since I retired, I have had inguinal hernia repair on both sides, am developing a pot belly, and am suffering from claudication in both legs.

Have seen a vascular surgeon with regard to my legs.

Have had a bilateral angiogram on both legs, which proved that both legs had blocked arteries. The surgeon is very reluctant to operate, and said the following. 80% of suffers will not get worse, 10% will need surgery, and 10% will get better. I can walk about 200 metres before I have to sit down, as the pain gets too bad.

The joys of getting old, and from having a hard working life.
 

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That reminds me of your sore neck could be fused bones in your spine . I got those bending over chart tables so I was told
Chart tables are renowned for health issues. I knew a girl who got pregnant bending over one!(Jester)
 

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But apart from that,how are things?.
Just had my first Colonoscopy,25 years late Yay.
Tell me, did they aneathsetize you for the colonoscopy procedure? I have had several colonoscopies, at 4 yearly intervals, here in Australia, under private insurance, and they always put me under. Stories I hear from the UK from people having it done on the National Health are that they leave them awake and they can feel every thing going on and it's not nice. However it's the preparation and fasting and flushing out on the day before that's the worst part. Each time they tell me the same thing, all OK, but mild diverticulosis present, and to eat more fruit. By this time I should be eating enough fruit to fill a room every day.
 

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Tell me, did they aneathsetize you for the colonoscopy procedure? I have had several colonoscopies, at 4 yearly intervals, here in Australia, under private insurance, and they always put me under. Stories I hear from the UK from people having it done on the National Health are that they leave them awake and they can feel every thing going on and it's not nice. However it's the preparation and fasting and flushing out on the day before that's the worst part. Each time they tell me the same thing, all OK, but mild diverticulosis present, and to eat more fruit. By this time I should be eating enough fruit to fill a room every day.
Yes they did Norm.. The anaesthetist (terrible word) told me I would be aware of what was going on but would feel nothing. I went one better and went out like a light. First thing I knew was when the surgeon put his hand(just one, thank god) on my shoulder, and told me it was all over. Luckily I can still afford(just) a Medical plan, but I have heard that State Patients here do not get the luxury of anaesthetic,which I imagine,as you say,is not nice.
The surgeon told me he removed one polyp but everything seemed fine and he was happy, I, on the other hand, was ecstatic.
I see diverticulosis is inflammation of the diverticulum which is not a word(s) I was familiar with. However I will commit it to memory now I've been initiated.
Cheers Norm. and lang may yer lum reek.
 

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Mine was done with just laughing gas mixture (which ran out just before the end!). I had the choice of being gassed proper but preferred it without. No pain.

Diverticuli- several of these:

A diverticulum is the medical or biological term for an outpouching of a hollow structure in the body. Depending upon which layers of the structure are involved, they are described as being either true or false.

-itis. Inflamation of....
 

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Think I'll have to stop reading this forum, getting fully depressed for being healthy, last time I felt like this was upon opening 'The Ship Captain's Medical Guide' which somehow seemed to infer that I had every disease described in its pages. (Read)
 
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