Ships Nostalgia banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Built in 1935 at Lobnitz Scotland. Served with the Auckland Harbour Board until 1977.
Now still steaming around the Auckland Harbour by a group of dedicated members doing charters, excursions etc.
Twin screwed triple expansion main engines supplied by two coal fired Scots Boilers.
Apart from necessary safety modifications she is still in the orginal design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,770 Posts
In the early '80s, BHP's 'Iron York' and 'Iron Baron' used to discharge steel products at Jellicoe Wharf and 'William C. Daldy' was always tied up astern of us. Several BHP Engineers worked on her and a couple of Masters commanded her on harbour tours when they were short of tickets. A nice example of trans-Tasman co-operation.

There was a watchman who lived aboard the tug and he was an honorary member of the 'Iron York's bar. Please pass on regards if he's still around.

John T.

PS Ray, I sailed on Stevie Clarke's 'Amberley', 'Storrington' and 'Harry Richardson' about the same time as you were with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,898 Posts
Ahoy,
Found a photo of her on trial.

The William C Daldy is a coal-fired steam tug, built at Renfrew on the Clyde in Scotland for the Auckland Harbour Board in 1935. After an 84 day delivery voyage to New Zealand, she entered service in February 1936, handling shipping in the port of Auckland. She served the Harbour Board well for 41 years and by the time she was retired in 1977 was one of the last working coal fired tugs in the world. There had been plans to convert her to oil firing or to re-engine her with twin diesels, but they came to nought. On retirement, the tug did not find her way to a ship-breaking yard, but passed into the hands of a preservation society. As a result, she is still active on Auckland Harbour in the North Island of New Zealand, after a career of more than 70 years.

The ‘Daldy is not a small vessel – she has a length of 126 feet (38.4 metres), a beam of 32 feet (9.75 metres) and a draft of 15 feet (4.5 metres). She is not slow either – she did 13.4 knots on trials and if her bottom is clean, she can still do 13 knots. A tug’s towing power is measured in bollard pull and the William C Daldy was conservatively measured at 17 tons on trials in 1935. Even the new motor tugs in Auckland in the 1960s were less than this, but her replacement, the 1977-built Daldy came in at 24 tons bollard pull.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
I remember the W C Daldy helping berthing along the container terminal at Auckland when I was on the ACT4. 2 steamers together as at that time the ACT4 was still steam powered but later converted to motor. The Daldy acted as midship push with the two tractor tugs fore and aft, can't remember their names but were always spotlessly clean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I was 2/E in BHP's "Iron Baron" in the early '80's and remember quite well a couple of days assisting the "Daldy's" blokes with some free lube oil and nuts and bolts etc......and possibly some good aussie beer as well.
cheers Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
why dont you interested people come down to devonport on a sat, and visit, you are all welcome,0930 onwards, Alex, President & Master.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
Hi Alex,
What a good idea, however, there are few expensive tickets involved, some ex London, some ex Melbourne/Sydney, ex Christchurch and ex Amsterdam.
Looks like a bit difficult getting us altogether on a Saturday.
I saw the vessel last month but did not go on board, there was an older gentleman sitting in the sun on the f'castle deck but I did not start a conversation.
Next time around I will contact you first.
Thanks and best regards
Jan
Keep the vessel shipshape......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,025 Posts
W.C.Daldy

raybnz said:
Built in 1935 at Lobnitz Scotland. Served with the Auckland Harbour Board until 1977.
Now still steaming around the Auckland Harbour by a group of dedicated members doing charters, excursions etc.
Twin screwed triple expansion main engines supplied by two coal fired Scots Boilers.
Apart from necessary safety modifications she is still in the orginal design.

Don't mean to nit-pick, but you give the impression that Lobnitz is a place
in Scotland . She would have been built at Simons Lobnitz yard in Renfrew
Scotland.
Also thought it was Scotch boilers.

JC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Scots Boilers

The guys that built them were a little short in height so hence the 'Scots Boilers'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,726 Posts
A most interesting read having been out on her. The QM2 trip was well worth he price of the flight and ticket. Shame I missed the evening cruise though .
I plan to post more shots I took on board that morning.

Best wishes and many thanks to Master and crew who made us most welcome on board

Martin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Really? Here is some information about Lobnitz & Co Limited

Don't mean to nit-pick, but you give the impression that Lobnitz is a place
in Scotland . She would have been built at Simons Lobnitz yard in Renfrew
Scotland.
Also thought it was Scotch boilers.

JC
Click below for the Lobnitz Quote for Tug W C Daldy

Lobnitz

Click below for the W C Daldy SCOTCH BOILERS IN ACTION

W C Daldy Boiler Room

For more information see:

daldy.info

Cheers,

Tripleexpansion
[email protected]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
More about W C Daldy

Ahoy,
Found a photo of her on trial.

The William C Daldy is a coal-fired steam tug, built at Renfrew on the Clyde in Scotland for the Auckland Harbour Board in 1935. After an 84 day delivery voyage to New Zealand, she entered service in February 1936, handling shipping in the port of Auckland. She served the Harbour Board well for 41 years and by the time she was retired in 1977 was one of the last working coal fired tugs in the world. There had been plans to convert her to oil firing or to re-engine her with twin diesels, but they came to nought. On retirement, the tug did not find her way to a ship-breaking yard, but passed into the hands of a preservation society. As a result, she is still active on Auckland Harbour in the North Island of New Zealand, after a career of more than 70 years.

The ‘Daldy is not a small vessel – she has a length of 126 feet (38.4 metres), a beam of 32 feet (9.75 metres) and a draft of 15 feet (4.5 metres). She is not slow either – she did 13.4 knots on trials and if her bottom is clean, she can still do 13 knots. A tug’s towing power is measured in bollard pull and the William C Daldy was conservatively measured at 17 tons on trials in 1935. Even the new motor tugs in Auckland in the 1960s were less than this, but her replacement, the 1977-built Daldy came in at 24 tons bollard pull.
Here is a larger shot of her on trial.

http://daldy.info/welcome.php

Here are her trial details from The Shipbuilder and Marine Engine Builder article on the tug:

Ship Info

Ship Plan

Ship Plan 2

More historical do***ents about the W C Daldy

Post some news!

Email Me

or visit my site

daldy.info
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
The updated web site is really good.Many thanks Courtney.

Even got a photo of me driving the starboard engine. Just itching to get back on board her again. Perhaps next season
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top