Ships Nostalgia banner

1 - 20 of 77 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Any of you fine chaps recall the spares we carried by regulation? Was it two spare valves for each one of that type in use? And three for every two in use? Something of the sort methinks.
I'm thinking of the stocktake we would need to do before the start of voyage. Was the spares cupboard ever inspected and checked by some shore-side authority?
I'm attempting to write a bit of memoir about commissioning Brocklebank's Mawana's wireless gear for her maiden voyage in 1958. Don Butterworth was my boss. Tom Eggleston was Master.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
The Radio Surveyor in Swansea just looked at my incredibly organised spares cupboard and said OK.
My experience was that when something went wrong it was usually something that wasn't on the spares list. Thankfully the radar spares usually held loads of components !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
I sailed with a R/O on a Ferry who was a bit (ahem!) obsessive about ac***ulating a shack full of spares and tools and who knew each page in the RS catalogue.

I will always remember meeting the Electrical/Electronics Superintendent coming out of the shack and shaking his head in wonderment and saying "He (the R/O) has got THREE OSCILLOSCOPES!" .

This at a time when no other Ferry in the Fleet even had one Oscilloscope.
:)
Regards, Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I recall, for valves. “ one valve for every three of a type, or part thereof”
3 valves of one type carry 1 spare
5 valves, carry 2 spare.

Many valves I found in the spares drawer, “Used but good”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,050 Posts
“Used but good”

Sounds like my stock of light globes and lawn mower spark plugs.(Jester)

(until you need to use them that is ...............)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I recall, for valves. “ one valve for every three of a type, or part thereof”
3 valves of one type carry 1 spare
5 valves, carry 2 spare.

Many valves I found in the spares drawer, “Used but good”
Thank you; that's illuminating. Perhaps Brocklebanks carried more spares - i recall an incident with the HF tx Siemens SB186x. En route up the Hooghli, the main power valve failed (wish I could remember the name of that large valve with an anode top cap).
We had TWO spares for that single valve.
Removed the failure and asked the junior to pass me a spare. He fumbled and dropped it onto the deck - bust. I got the last spare myself and fitted it.
As I attached the connection to the top cap, it broke away from the glass leaving a tiny trace of metal on the pip.
I wrapped a towel around the valve, and another around my face (goggles fitted). With the big valve between my knees, I filed away enough of the glass pip to expose more metal. Then gingerly applied a drop of solder to the tiny bit of wire Then soldered the anode connection in place - whereupon we were back on air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
807, 813?
Spare valves, lamps, fuses and brushes. Nothing for the VHF.
AVO minor, couple of bent screwdrivers and a 100 watt soldering iron seemed to be the norm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Luxury - TWO bent screwdrivers. I had to MAKE one on the British Scientist (?) when converting cabins into luxury Apprentice accommodation.
The previous R/O had forgotten to re-order replacements.
Happy Daze.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,483 Posts
Luxury - TWO bent screwdrivers. I had to MAKE one on the British Scientist (?) when converting cabins into luxury Apprentice accommodation.
The previous R/O had forgotten to re-order replacements.
Happy Daze.
Did you make it with the bend, or add the bend later(==D)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
1981 I was on board a Hong Kong registered ship calling at a few ports on the Aussie coast. In Sydney the local radio inspector came on board, quite obviously looking for defects due to a cabotage dispute raging in Oz at that time. Unions and inspectors swarming everywhere making life difficult. This bloke could find nothing wrong. The logs and batteries and equipment were all in good order. Finally he put us down for a deficiency; no non-magnetic screwdriver for radar maintenance . Ship agent was scrambled and scoured the shops for said screwdriver, which he found after some hours. Ship was released to sail to next port but we had missed the pilot slot so were one day delayed. True story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,857 Posts
My visit to a ship at Shellhaven to review some trials equipment coincided with a Post Office survey of the (MIMCo) radio station by the infamous Harry Gilder. A local MIMCo technician was in attendance.

Harry could find nothing wrong with any of the equipment or do***entation but eventually said he would not give clearance because the spares were not in compliance with the UK's Radio Rules' requirement that there should be an amount (I believe 1oz.) of petroleum jelly - better known by its trade name, Vaseline. There was indeed a tin of Vaseline (marked with the proper quantity) present in the Radio Room but someone had taken a finger swipe across the surface, removing a small amount of the content. Harry claimed that therefore there was less than the required amount present in the tin and he could not approve the installation as being compliant.

As the ship was due to sail with the tide, the MIMCo technician had to drive posthaste to East Ham depot to collect another tin of Vaseline.

It happened to be a Shell tanker and I'm sure that the engine room had enough suitable grease to submerge the surveyor never mind coat any battery terminals or other metal surfaces needing protection against corrosion, but "rules are rules", "it's more than my job's worth ...."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,418 Posts
As the seagoing towrag on attachment to East Ham's tech staff one leave it often fell to me to be left holding the Radio Surveyor's hand (not a requirement except when Harry was on the job). A thorough man indeed.

There is the story (possibly Ron's) of his grasping the mains leads to the DF Set only to find that the insulation remained only between the poles and not on the outside where Harry was then completing the circuit across the mains. I am told he swore the technician in attendance to say nothing of the jig that he danced until disconnected and I certainly did not hear that story until he must have been long gone.

I did take the opportunity to have him sign off on my six months sea time and his signature it is on my MRGC (M/57).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
I had a valve tester on my last ship. Had never seen one before, but it turned out to be part of the Chief Eng's gear and the installers didn't know where it was meant to go. I saw off a couple of the 'Used but Good' valves before I got the measure of it !

Fond memories of the SB186. Not brilliant, but I don't remember any problems - it just worked ok.

David
+
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,136 Posts
#17 ... SB186 info from an old text book and 4069A pic from Fleabay amazingly still available today..
Wouldn't like to comment on why RF pentode and not beam tetrode except what valve manufacturer Siemens preferred.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
779 Posts
I've always thought that MIMCO had somehow acquired a huge amount of 807 beam tetrodes, and designed all their tx,s around it. Never had a problem with it.
 
1 - 20 of 77 Posts
Top